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Full text of "Annual report of the president of the Mercantitle Library Association of San Francisco"

LIST OF OFFICERS 



H>K 1867 



PRKS1 DXNT 



WILLIAM H. L. BARNES. 

TICK PRXSJDXMT: 

ROBERT B. SWAIN. 



SECRETARIES: 

*QftM*rUMt>IMU, 

Afr»1tftlAYKS. DA 



ancuftuiNc, 



DAVID WILDER. 



TREASURER 

WILLIAM C RALSTON. 

tiuitiii: 
WM.C. BADGER, H. II. BIGELOW, 

j. M. McNCi.TY. GEORGE C. SHREVE, 

GE< ►RGB A. LOW, ARTHUR M. EBBETS, 

B. DEWEY, I / WILLIAM R. WOOD, 

K. B. REYNOLDS. 



•c'H 






■ 



... . . 

- • 
■ 



CALIFORNIANA 



SAN FRANCISCO PUBLIC LIBRARY 



3 1223 03528 9496 

SAN FRANCISCO PUBLIC LIBRARY 



3 1223 03528 9504 

SAN FRANCISCO PUBLIC LIBRARY 



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Book 



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Accession 



^M > T\ 



NOT TO BE TAKEN FROM THE LIBRARY 



FORM NO. 64. 3 M. 7-2S-10 



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Digitized by the Internet Archive 

in 2012 with funding from 

California State Library Califa/LSTA Grant 



http://archive.org/details/annualreporto18531863merc 



FIRST 





ANNUAL REPORT 



OP THE 



PRESIDENT 



OF THE 




ertanfile IFikarg JsMriata 



OIF SAJXT FRAISTOISOO, 



FOR THE YEARS 1853 AND '54, 



Made January, 1855. 



< — »— ►- 



SAN FRANCISCO 



I 






TOWNE & BACON, PRINTERS, 

EXOELSIOB OFFICE, 

125 Clay Street, San Francisco. 



m a mum ux xm% 



DAVID S. TURNER. 

Via ^wsiUnrt: ' 

J. P. HAVEN. C. E. BOWERS, Jr. 2 

WM. H. STEVENS. Dr. H. GIBBONS. 



C. E. DUNBAR, J. B. CROCKETT, 

D. H. HASKELL, 1 E. P. FLINT. 



-i-~»»~— ►- 



fat <rf (SWtow fw 1S54 



DAVID S. TURNER. 

H. CHANNING BEALS, C. L. STRONG, 

W. H. STEVENS, F. A. WOODWORTH. 

W. R. WADSWORTH, F. S. HAWLEY, 

J. H. PURKITT, A. G. RANDALL, 

E. P. FLINT, W. McMICHAEL, 

D. 0. VAIL, P. A. ROACH, 

J. H. GARDINER. 



1 Resigned June 8th and was succeeded by F. A. Wood worth. 

2 Resigned August 3d, and was succeeded by C. L. Strong. 

J. H. Purkitt and W. R. Wadsworth, were elected Directors in September. 



REPORT. 



Gentlemen of the Mercantile Library Association: — 

In presenting this, the first regular report of your Association, it 
becomes my duty, as President, to recall to your minds some of the 
various incidents which have occurred since the commencement of our 
enterprise, as well as to give, to some extent, a detailed account of our 
present condition. And inasmuch as this is the first regular report 
which has been made of our aifairs, notwithstanding our two years' 
existence, it may be necessary to go to our beginning, in order that 
we may place fairly before the community the various steps by which 
we have advanced to the position we now occupy, and to which we are 
mainly indebted through the liberality which has been extended to us 
by a portion of that community. 

It seems to me fitting in this place, and not inappropriate to this 
occasion, that I should here refer to the endeavor on the part of a 
number of our citizens to establish the " California Institute." During ' 
the fall and winter of 1851 and 1852 — the officers and directors were 
elected, comprising among their number many gentlemen whose names 
now appear as friends of our institution. 

After having furnished rooms for the accommodation of readers, and 
expended a considerable sum for reading matter, furniture, &c, the 
enterprise was abandoned until such time as increase of numbers and 
interest should warrant its friends in encountering the heavy expenses 
necessary, at that time, to such undertaking. 

The existence of our Association, under its present organization, 
dates from the 22d of December, 1852, on which day there assembled 
in the Common Council Chambers of our city a considerable number 



v 



• 



J 



of persons friendly to the formation of a Library Association ; deeply 
impressed with the importance of affording to the members of our com- 
munity the means of such intellectual and moral instruction as experi- 
ence had taught them to believe was derived from institutions, 
established and carried on upon a basis and of general character simi- 
lar to such institutions in the Atlantic cities. With this general 
object in view, the first meeting was organized. J. B. Crockett, Esq., 
was called to preside, and matters were discussed relating to the general 
interests of this enterprise. To this gentleman we are under many 
and continued obligations from our commencement — he has ever been 
ready and willing to aid us by his counsel and encouragement, as well 
in his character as an able advocate, as also as in his position as a firm 
friend of the institution to which it has been his pleasure to afford 
assistance in any manner calculated to promote its best interests. 

At the meeting referred to, proper committees were appointed upon 
various subjects, to one of which was confided the duty of preparing 
an address to the people of San Francisco, upon the subject of the 
proposed Association. This address was extensively circulated, and a 
general feeling was enlisted in its favor. In the meantime the com- 
mittee appointed to solicit subscriptions in aid of the enterprise, reported 
six thousand dollars pledged, and which could be collected whenever it 
should be required. Under such encouragement it was thought advis- 
able at once to commence operations, and on the 25th of January, 
1853, a meeting was called for the election of officers, which resulted 
in the return of a full board of officers and directors. Eighty votes 
were cast, and an excellent feeling prevailed. The officers and direct- 
ors were as follows : 

David S. Turner, President ; J. P. Haven, Vice President ; W. H. 
Stevens, Recording Secretary; Dr. H. Gibbons, Corresponding Sec- 
retary; Charles E. Bowers, Jr., Treasurer; C.E.Dunbar, D. H. 
Haskell, J. B. Crockett, and E. P. Flint, Directors. 

Measurers were taken without delay, by proper committees, to 
secure rooms, furniture, &c, and the committee on books purchased 
from Brigadier General Hitchcock, U. S. A., a valuable private library, 
consisting of about 2,500 books and pamphlets, and with this collec- 
tion as a nucleus for future operations, our rooms in the building 
known as the California Exchange, at the corner of Clay and Kearny 



streets, were opened to readers on or about the first day of February, 
1853. 

Such, gentlemen, is a brief history of the origin of our Association. 
We have progressed steadily, though at some times under great em- 
barrassments, but our community have at all times liberally responded 
to our applications for relief, and through their generosity we are able 
to present to you, at this moment, a library of nearly 4,000 volumes, 
a large number of periodicals, magazines, &c, regular supplies of 
newspapers from all parts of the commercial world ; our rooms com- 
fortably furnished ; free from any pecuniary obligations, and with a 
few hundred dollars in our treasury. 

And now, gentlemen, in view of the success which has attended our 
enterprise, have we not cause to rejoice over it, and pour out our 
hearts in gratitude in return for the attainment of a degree of pros- 
perity to which, in our most enthusiastic anticipations, we could not 
even hope to have realized within so brief a period as two years. 

And while we acknowledge a kind overruling Providence which 
has attended us, and upon all occasions " waited upon our steps," we 
should not be unmindful of the kindness and liberality which has been 
extended to us, as well by friends abroad as by our own generous and 
warm-hearted citizens of San Francisco. During the existence of our 
Association, some feeling of dissatisfaction has been expressed on ac- 
count of the distinctive name by which we are known — thereby claim- 
ing that we were exclusively of a mercantile character, and by our 
organization excluding those of other professions or occupations. This 
feeling, however, has been entirely imaginary, for it has ever been the 
earnest desire of all concerned to unite as much as possible all classes 
of the community ; but it has happened that the great proportion of 
members has been from among merchants and merchants' clerks, and 
hence the cause of its having been organized under its present name. 
However this may be, or whether or not this feeling may have given 
impulse to the formation of a similar institution among the mechanics 
of our city, we hail with pleasure the effort to organize and establish 
the Mechanics' Association, and bid them " God speed ; " wishing 
them every success in their worthy undertaking, at the same time 
giving them full assurance that Ave will ever co-operate with them in 
such measures as shall tend to the best interests of all their endeavors 



8 

to extend valuable information among our citizens ; while we enter the 
lists with them in generous and liberal rivalry as to which shall be able 
to effect most towards the great object we have in view. 

It is perhaps questionable, however, taking into view the great ex- 
pense necessarily attendant upon such an enterprise, whether the union 
of all classes, or whether two separate organizations might be the most 
beneficial ; perhaps, however, it may be most expedient that there 
should be separate organizations, each one acting in its own sphere, 
and thereby securing to their individual advantage some influences 
which they might not obtain were they consolidated. The aim and 
object of our institution is, to place within the reach of our fellow- 
citizens the means of acquiring useful information, of elevating their 
intellectual and moral qualities, as well as to afford the younger mem- 
/ bers a comfortable, quiet, and respectable place of resort, where, sep- 
arate from the evil influences which they encounter in places of public 
amusement, they may at once spend their leisure hours cultivating 
their minds and acquiring those habits of sobriety and morality so 
essential to the formation of character, where character is so valuable 
and so highly appreciated as it is in our young and prosperous city. 
Any measures which shall attain to the accomplishment of those 
objects, whether it be through the influence of one or more institutions, 
will meet with the unqualified approbation of our citizens, and will be 
hailed as an indication of a state of things which is to give to our 
institutions and to our standing as a people, prominence and stability 
at home, as well as character, respectability, and influence abroad. 
The establishment of libraries, schools, literary and religious institu- 
tions, is one among the many striking features of San Francisco, and 
decidedly marks the energy of our people, and their disposition that 
law, order, and good conduct shall be observed, and that society should 
be formed upon a basis which gives character to other communities, 
where experience has taught the value of institutions calculated to 
promote the moral and intellectual capacity *of the people. 

I propose to give a few moments to the consideration of the present 
condition of our Association, and to our available means for sustaining 
the heavy expense we must necessarily encounter. In pursuing this 
subject, however, I shall not attempt to go into detail, but only in brief 
give a general idea of our condition. The monthly expenses are 



about $600 — say rent, $200 ; librarian, $175 ; assistant librarian, 
$80; incidentals, $145. 

To meet this expense, we have four hundred and seventy-two share- 
holders and subscribing members, paying each one dollar per month, 
or four hundred and seventy-two dollars per month, leaving a defici- 
ency of one hundred and twenty-eight dollars, which sum may be 
considered fully provided for by the usual increase on our subscription 
list. 

Our members at present consist of : honorary, forty-one ; life, thirty- 
nine ; shareholders, paying, three hundred and two ; subscribing mem- 
bers, paying, one hundred and seventy ; total, five hundred and fifty- 
two. Number of bound volumes, three thousand, three hundred and 
fifteen, being an increase of five hundred and ninety volumes since 
the first of May last. 

We have many hundreds of Magazines and periodicals, not included 
in the above estimate ; (a large supply of daily and weekly newspapers 
from various parts of our own, as well as other countries ; in fact, 
through the kindness of editors and publishers, our reading matter 
relating to the current affairs of the day, is as complete as in our 
remote position we could reasonably expect. I cannot more under- 
standingly bring to your knowledge the continued increase of our 
Association, than by giving a statement of the books taken from the 
library during a portion of the past year ; and commencing with the 
opening of our rooms in our present location, we find that there have 
been delivered by the librarian to readers, who have removed the 
same to their residences, books as follows, through the several months, 
say—March, 103 ; April, 172 ; May, 166 ; June, 244 ; July, 316 ; 
August, 346 ; September, 387 ; October, 483 ; November, 598 ; 
December, 556 ; showing the remarkable increase of from one hun- 
dred to more than jive hundred within a period of ten months. 

This fact, of itself, is a convincing proof of the signal success which 
has attended our efforts to create a taste and disposition among our 
citizens to attend our rooms, read our books, and render us such assist- 
ance as their presence, the use of their means, and their influence 
were calculated to afford us. 

We have derived much benefit from the appointment of an agent 
in the city of New York — Mr. C. B. Norton — who has kindly con- 






10 



sented to supply us with new publications, and to take charge of and 
forward to us whatever may be entrusted to his care. 

Our receipts by donations during the past few months have been 
quite large. The following are the names of some of those to whom 
we are indebted in this respect — to all of whom, on behalf of the 
Association, I beg to tender my grateful acknowledgement for their 
liberality.: — 

Hons. Thomas H. Benton, James Savage, John B. Weller, Wm. M. 
Gwin, A. C. Dodge, R. C. Winthrop, J. A. MacDougal, M. S. Laih- 
am, Edward Everett, C. K. Garrison ; Messrs. Halleck, Peachy, 
Billings & Park, Tilden & Little, Britton & Rey, De Witt & Harrison, 
Farwell & Curtis, W. H. J. Brooks, F. W. Macondray, William 
Wood, C. J. Dempster, Theo. Payne, J. H. Purkitt, H. C. Seals, 
H. C. Clark, Washington Bartlett, David S. Turner, Henry A. Har- 
rison, W. H. Stevens, A. Thomas, Frank D. Stewart, P. B. Corn- 
wall, Wm. Blackburn, C. C. Wisner, David Jobson, G. W. Murray, 
Jonah Drake, Richard Rising, G. W. Tickenor, M. Bixley, J. W. 
Sullivan, P. C. Egan, J. S. Hittell, J. Coolidge Stone, A. G. Randall, 
John J. Tayker, H. Benham, Thos. C. Downer, Lawrence Phillips, 
Edwin Lewis, T. W. Sutherland, C. C. Southard, M. M. Noah, H. 
La Reintne, Wm. Baker, Jr., D. Hale Haskell, Joseph W. Finlay, 
George H. Davis, Wm. R. Wadsworth, Conrey, J. P. Haven, J. Smith 
Homans, Luther Severance, L. L. Blood, John Perry, Jr., Nathan 
Scholfielcl, Thos. A. Mudge, James Holden Lander, Charles L. Strong, 
A. G. Lawrence, W. A. Macondray, F. C. Ewer, Thos. Tennent, J. 
H. Rider, Capt. John F. Schander, Capt. Wm. MacMichael, Capt. E. 
S. Coffin, Capt. Cressy, ship " Flying Cloud," Alta California, Pacific, 
James Lenox, Esq., New York City; B. B. Burt, Esq., Oswego, New 
York; C. C. Rafin, Esq., Copenhagen, Denmark, by Joseph Frontin, 
Esq.; F. A. Woodworth, Esq.; Rev. W. A. 'Scott, A. D. Bache, 
Esq., United States Coast Survey; Smithsonian Institute, New York 
Society Library, New York Mercantile Library ; together with many 
others, whose names appear on our books, recorded as patrons of our 
Association. 

My limits will not allow me to particularize all the individual favors 
we have received through the kindness of many friends who have 
materially assisted us by their donations. 



11 

The course of lectures commenced during the past season were not 
as successful as we could have wished ; nor were they generally well 
attended, and the disinclination for this kind of instruction was such 
as to induce a suspension of the course, to be renewed again, however, 
when the public taste shall be more in favor, and public amusements 
less numerous and less attractive to our people. The debates which 
have been held at our rooms have occasionally brought forward subjects 
of much interest, and have generally been conducted with a degree of 
ability highly creditable to those concerned in them, while the nature 
of the subjects introduced have stimulated our readers to a critical 
examination of books of reference and history, as beneficial to their 
particular purpose as it was to their general stock of knowledge upon 
such subjects as might be brought before them. I should do injustice 
to my own feelings, as well as to the gentleman of whom I am about 
to speak, if I did not allude to the very efficient aid we have received 
from our librarian, Mr. Horace Davis ; and although he has, to a con- 
siderable extent, been relieved in his duties by his faithful assistant, 
John J. Tayker, yet, when we take into consideration that in addition 
to his constant service in the library, he has arranged, written out, 
and corrected our catalogue, which was to be compiled after a careful 
examination of each work in the library, we shall place a proper estima- 
tion upon the value of his services ; this being the first catalogue, and 
without means at hand for assistance, which misrht have been obtained 
in other cities, rendered it a work of much labor. 

The establishment of libraries, from the earliest days down to our 
own times, is a subject which has engaged the attention of wise and 
good men of all countries ; and the advantages to be derived from 
such institutions are especially adapted to our own State and peo- 
ple, and we have before us, in the establishment of our own Associa- 
tion, a proof of the favor with which our enterprise is looked upon by 
that class of our community of whose approbation we should be proud 
to be the recipients, and whose encouragement has not failed to give 
us strength in our most trying condition. 

In this connection, I beg your indulgence for a few moments, while 
I digress from the subject before us, and notice matters bearing close 
analogy to that which we are now considering. 

I conceive our public schools, public libraries, and our public press 



12 

the three great engines which control the destinies of our people, and 
give distinctive character to citizens of the United States. In our 
public schools our children are trained with such care and with such 
success, that they enter with a peculiar fitness upon the higher 
grades of intellectual attainment, as they are to be found in our public 
libraries, which, in the present arrangement of our literary institutions, 

■J # 

seem to be so organized as to be admirably adapted to the extension of 
that condition of intellectual acquirement of which our public schools 
are only preparatory. And it is through the machinery of the public 
press that the intelligence which is acquired in our schools and libra- 
ries is disseminated through all portions of our country, giving char- 
acter and influence in a degree corresponding to the extent and 
respectability which is assumed by those having it in charge. 

But I return to the consideration of our subject, and although I am 
sensible of the liberality with which our efforts have been met by our 
citizens, I cannot dismiss from my mind that many of them are not 
aware of the value of our Association, or the extent of time and ex- 
ertion which has been necessary to bring it to its pre,sent prosperous 
condition, and will trust that their liberality will be continued, and 
their interest in its welfare so increased as to give a wider range to 
its usefulness and prosperity. 

Some attention has been given to the subject of creating a "Build- 
ing Fund," in order to enable the Association to take the necessary 
steps towards procuring a building adapted to our accommodation, and 
arranged upon such principles as would not only accommodate our 
members, but at the same time reduce our expenses for rent, if not 
even be made to produce an income. This subject is of great interest 
to us, and will receive the careful attention of those gentlemen to 
whom its consideration has been committed ; and I trust that in their 
wisdom they may be able at no distant period to bring the matter for- 
ward in such manner as shall meet the views of our friends. 

Our institution at present is but a miniature of what it is to be, and 
perhaps may be thought of as a matter of too trifling importance to 
be the subject of an annual report ; but our desire is, to attract atten- 
tion to our real condition, and to the objects we wish to accomplish. 

The education of young men destined to become merchants, or in 
any manner connected with commercial pursuits, is a subject which 






13 



should command our first attention ; it is through them, and by their 
various associations, that our successors are to be brought in contact 
with people of distant countries, and through their means, civilization, 
with its attendant blessings, borne upon the wings of Commerce, is to 
be conveyed to those benighted regions which are yet without its 
elevating influences — the delights of civilization, or the hopes of im- 
mortality, through the glorious system of Christianity. I would now, 
in conclusion, ask your attention while I refer to matters of a personal 
character, and to circumstances connected with my retirement from 
the official position which, through your kindness, I have been permit- 
ted to occupy during the past two years. 

By a wise provision in your constitution, I was ineligible to re-elec- 
tion at the close of the present year, having served the full constitu- 
tional term ; but were this not so, I could not consent again to devote 
the time necessary to a performance of the duties required, while I 
was aware that many others among your members were better calcu- 
lated to promote the interests of your institution, and better able to 
devote the time necessary to a performance of the duties devolving 
upon the president. And it is matter of congratulation that your 
choice has fallen upon a gentleman in every way calculated to pro- 
mote your best interests — one who is competent, willing, and energetic, 
and to whom you may look for such attention as will insure success 
and prosperity beyond that which you now enjoy. 

Many of you are aware that in November of last year I left San 
Francisco on a visit to the Atlantic States, and that at the regular 
monthly meeting previous to my departure, my resignation as Presi- 
dent of your Association was brought forward, which, however, the 
meeting refused to accept, resolving at the same time that I should 
retain my official position and represent your interests where ever it 
should be in my power to promote measures connected with your pros- 
perity. This evidence of your confidence and proof of your kindness 
induced its withdrawal, but with the full expectation that I should be 
relieved from my duties, by the election of a new president at the 
close of the year. 

My surprise was great at hearing of my re-election while continuing 
my visit, and gratified upon my return here, to find the improvements 
which had been effected during my absence ; the removal to the rooms 



14 



as occupied at present ; the increase of members, improuement in 
financial affairs, and general condition of prosperity, rendered it evi- 
dent to me that by judicious and energetic action, you were too firmly 
established to admit of any doubt of your future success. 

And now, gentlemen, having partially and imperfectly reviewed our 
transactions for the past two years, and being about to take leave of 
you in my official capacity, and surrender into other hands the execu- 
tion of those duties which I have endeavored to fulfill, I feel that I 
cannot close my remarks without calling to your minds the improve- 
ment we discover in our Association, in a social view, independent of 
our moral and literary advancement. 

Those of you who were among the first in this enterprise will well 
recollect how frequently it was necessary to adjourn our monthly meet- 
ings for want of a constitutional quorum, and how small the number of 
visitors at our rooms, as compared with the present — indeed the most 
striking feature of encouragement is, that we now find our rooms well 
filled with visitors every evening, quiet, respectful, and attentive, giv- 
ing their time and attention to the cultivation of their intellectual 
faculties, and thereby avoiding the dangers to which they must neces- 
sarily be exposed by indiscriminate participation in our places of public 
amusement and entertainments, and the many allurements connected 
therewith. This is matter of great gratification ; and in a few years 
we shall look back upon our efforts in the establishment of this institu- 
tion with satisfaction at having taken at least one step towards improve- 
ment of the moral and intellectual condition of the citizens of our 
young and enterprising city. 

I cannot refrain from giving expression to my grateful feelings for 
the many acts of kindness, the ever respectful attention, and the per- 
fect obedience to rules, as exhibited towards me by the members upon 
all occasions. This has been to me peculiarity gratifying, and has 
so fastened upon my heart that I shall not be unmindful to the last day 
of my life. 

To the Board of Directors, and to the officers with whom it has 
been my privilege to be associated, I cannot find language to give ex- 
pression to the great gratification I have experienced during my 
co-operation with them — during all the trials and vexations we have 
passed through in the establishment of this enterprise, we have ever 



15 

found, upon every occasion, that the execution of a duty called forth 
the best feelings of all concerned, and no objection, or disposition to 
shrink from service has ever been indulged in by any member of the 
Board, from our organization down to the present time. 

It has been by this concert of united action by the Board of Direc- 
tors, a fixed determination on their part to succeed in our undertaking, 
and assisted by the liberality of our citizens, that we find ourselves 
to-day in the enjoyment of a library and rooms which would be credi- 
table in any Atlantic city of equal size — free from debt, with money 
in our treasury, and composed of members of such character and 
standing as to give warrant to the realization of our most sanguine 
expectations as to the continued prosperity of our institution. 

And thus, gentlemen, however unworthily I may have performed 
the duties which your confidence has entrusted to my care, or however 
unacceptably I may have presented this report, the last of my official 
acts, with a full and perfect assurance of the continued and increasing 
prosperity of your Association, so endeared to me by my connection 
with it from its commencement, and in the hope that the same unanim- 
ity which has prevailed in your councils during the past two years will 
continue for the future ; and with my sincere thanks for your attention 
upon this occasion, I now resign my position into the keeping of my 
worthy successor, and relinquish to him the execution of those duties 
which, as President of your Association, have occupied my attention. 

DAVID S. TURNER. 



THIRD 



ANNUAL REPORT 



OF THE 



PRESIDENT 



OF THE 




mmtlk Jffirrarn ^wxtMxm, 



OF 



S^N FEANCISCO 



MADE 



JANUARY, 1856. 



SAN FEANCISCO: 



CHARLES F. ROBBINS & FREEMAN, PRINTERS, 

CORNIR OF CLAY AND BATTERY STREETS. 



1859. 



LIST OF OFFICERS 



OK THE 



ertanfih f ibraru %B$athtnrt f 



FOB 1855-6. 



President: 
HENRY M. HALE. 



Vice President : 
WM. H. STEVENS, 



Treasurer : 
SPEAR RIDDELL. 



Rec. Sec'y: 
3. H. GARDINER. 



Car. Sec'y : 
P. A. WOOD WORTH. 



Directors : 

J. H. PLJRKITT, R. D. W. DAVIS, 

IRA P. RANKIN, R. E. BREWSTER, 

A. W. McKEE, W. A. MACONDRAY, 

J. B. NEWTON, J. M. COUGHLIN, 

W. R. WADSWORTH. 



ANNUAL REPORT 

OF THE 

PRESIDENT 

OF THE 

ttmtilt liters %*mhtm of $m itmtmn. 



In behalf of the Board of Direction, I have pleasure in sub- 
mitting to the members at large, some notes of the condition and 
progress of our Association. # 

The number of Books belonging to the Library is nearly lour 
thousand. Increase since last year, six hundred and sixty-four vol- 
The classification of Books on our shelves is as follows : 



umes. 



and Fiction, 394, « 



Law, Politics and Jurisprudence, 335, or about 8 per cent. 

Romance and 
Belle Lettres,. 
Science 
History,. 



,...257, " " 6 '" " 

" """ OKfi u " 6 " " 

Science and Philosophy, ^ 00 > 

252, " " 6 " 

246 " " 6 " " 
Biography, ' „ .. ,. 

Travels, ^ D ' 

Religion, z ^> , ° 

Poetry and the Drama, 1JJ ' 

Works of Reference, 3 «> ^ u ^ (< u 

Du P licates ' U6 ' u .. 4 « « 

Invoice not landed, x *"> 

Periodicals, bound, °^' ■ 

Miscellaneous, ....oat , 

Total, 3,979 volumes. 

The Periodicals are, many of them, of ancient date, and valu- 
able as being nearly out of print. 

The Books classed as Miscellaneous, are, upon the average, ot 
the higher order of authorship, including the collated works ot 
Statesmen, Jurists, and Philosophers. _ % 

The funds on hand, which are of recent accumulation, justity 
an immediate and liberal increase of the Library by the succeed- 
ing Board of Direction. 



6 

The whole number of readers of the books of the Library, dur- 
ing the year, was five hundred and thirty-eight. Strangers intro- 
duced, one hundred and six. 

The number of books taken out, during the year, was eight 
thousand three hundred and sixty-seven, classified as follows : 

Romance and Fiction, 3,626 volumes, or about 43 per cent. 

Travels, 1,240 » " " 15 " " 

Biography, 943 " " " 11 " " 

History, 887 " " " 11 " " 

Science and Philosophy, 345 " " " 4 " " 

Miscellaneous, (Standard Works,) 336 " " " 4 " " 

Essays and Criticism, 277 " " " 3 " " 

Poetry and the Drama, 246 " " " 3 " " 

Periodicals, bound, 250 " " " 3 " " 

Religion, 122 " " « 2 " " 

Law, Politics, and Jurisprudence, 95 " " 1 " " 

The average withdrawn per month was six hundred and ninety- 
seven. The average of the monthly withdrawals of the previous 
year was but three hundred and thirty-seven. The increase of 
reading during the past year is, therefore, shown to have been a 
hundred per cent., or more, over the previous year. 

It has sometimes been charged that too large a proportion of 
our books are of the class denominated light literature ; reference 
to the classification already given, and a comparison of this table 
with that of the withdrawals by readers, will show that, if our 
supply is to be regulated by the demand, this allegation is incor- 
rect. The percentage of Works of Eomance and Fiction belong- 
ing to the shelves of the Library is about ten per cent., while for- 
ty-three per cent, of all the withdrawals by readers have been of 
this class. An examination of the book-shelves will, at any time, 
reveal a large number of works of the highest order of literature 
wearing a domestic stay-at-home look, while the gaping vacancies 
in the departments of "Romance, Humor, and Fiction" indicate 
that their fashionable proprietors have so extensive an acquaintance 
as to require to be ever abroad. A majority of our readers are 
actively employed during the day, and it is not unnatural that a 
craving for light mental recreation should dictate the choice of the 
novel for a leisure hour. "Without doubt, as the pursuits of our 
business population become more regular, and the restlessness and 
excitement incident to a new country give place to a settled and 
domestic principle of life, and as the influences of the Pulpit, the 



Press, and the Family, gather strength and effect in improving 
public morals and in developing popular intelligence and senti- 
ment, a change for the better will take place in the reading of our 
members. It must be borne in mind, however, that books of a 
light character are read much more rapidly than those of a higher 
order, hence the numerical disproportion of books of fiction (forty- 
three per cent.) taken from the Library, should be considered with 
some grains of allowance ; besides which, the other classifications, 
although divided under ten heads, and thus showing under each a 
small percentage, show in the aggregate fifty-seven per cent, of 
the entire reading, and chiefly in the instructive, useful, or stand- 
ard departments of letters. 

I am happy to say that I do not know of an objectionable book 
in the Library, judged by the ordinary moral standard. The rare 
private library of a gentleman of fastidious and curious taste, 
(Gen. Hitchcock), formed an excellent nucleus for our collection. 

The course of Lectures, now in progress of delivery, has been 
highly successful, both in the demonstration of local literary talent 
and public taste, and as a source of revenue to the Association. 
As the first systematic and popular course of lectures given in our 
city, and liberally supported, we may cherish the hope that our 
efforts have initiated here a system of intellectual communication 
which will be as beneficial and gratifying in its results and influ- 
ences to and upon our community, as the same system has proved 
in older States and countries. 

The amount received for tickets, for the course of Lectures, is 
$3,074. 

The Lectures delivered, or yet to be given in the course, are as 
follows : 

1. By Rev. Dr. Scott, on Commerce and Letters. Poem, by Frank Soule, Esq. 

2. By Dr. C. H. Raymond, on Chemistry. 

3. By George W. Minns, Esq., on Japan. 

4. By John A. Wills, Esq., on The Proscription of the Chinese. 

5. By Joseph W. Winans, Esq., on The Dignity of Labor. 

6. By Hon. E. D. Baker, on Books. 

7. By Dr. W. 0. Ayers, on The Unity and Perfection of Design in the Creation. 

8. By Rev. Wm. Spear, on Ancient Babylon, the first Metropolis of Commerce 
and Learning. 

9. By Wm. W. Shepard, Esq., on Aristocracy. 

10. By Rev. M. C. Briggs, on Idleness, the Result of the Poverty of Ill-Governed 
and the Wealth of Well-Governed States. 

11. By Hon. Wm. Duer, on American Civilization. 



The Lecture system, in maturer communities, has received the 
support of the most distinguished men of letters. May our citizens 
and literary and professional men, encourage and extend what our 
Association has begun. 

The number of paying shareholders and subscribers is about 
four hundred and fifty ; the coming election will probably increase 
the number. The last Annual Report showed four hundred and 
eighty-two paying members and shareholders, but the statement 
was made up immediately after election. The shareholders and 
subscribers are about equally divided. There are fifty-six life and 
forty-four honorary members ; thirty-two shares were issued during 
the year. The whole number of persons who have joined the As- 
sociation, since its organization to the present time, is about 1,000. 

The Treasurer's Report is gratifying : 

Amount on hand at the commencement of the year, §1,681 77 

Received from all sources during the year, 9,411 86 

Total, $11,093 63 

Total disbursements, paid or audited to be paid, 9,104 22 

Balance to new year, all bills being provided for Si, 989 41 

About $500 of the disbursements of the year, were upon bills in- 
curred the previous year, 1854, and do not properly belong to the 
expense account of 1855. 

It is a fact scarcely known to members, that the ordinary in- 
come of the Association from dues, sale of shares, and life mem- 
berships, does not equal the ordinary expenses. The receipts from 
ordinary sources, during the past year, were but $5,837 61. Do- 
nations and income from lectures are not included in this sum. 
The expenses, not including purchase of books or expense of lec- 
tures, were $7,964 22. Here, then, is a deficiency of $2,126 61 in 
the legitimate and regular income, as compared with the current 
working expenses of the Association. It is evident that the reve- 
nues of the institution must be increased, or its expenses diminish- 
ed. Donations and profits on lectures should only be depended 
upon, and only be used, to increase the Library or to accumulate a 
fund for the purpose of some time building an edifice that we can 
call our own. 

An increase in the rates of initiation fees and monthly dues 
would be an unpopular measure, and would probably result in no 
enlargement of income, but rather in a diminution of subscribers. 
Every attempt at a wise economy has been made by the Board of 



Direction, and but little can be saved by reduction of expenses. 
Our rooms are much too cramped, even for present uses, to admit 
of our going into smaller ones, and the rent has been reduced, by 
repeated solicitations, till the proprietors declare that they will 
concede no farther. What then is to be done? Let our members see 
the importance of effort, and zealously determine to exert them- 
selves, each and every one, to add some new members to our roll. 
Our community is increasing in numbers and wealth, and it would 
ill befit the nerve and vigor of a society composed of men of its 
most enterprising classes, to shrink from a high aim and purpose 
and to retire within more contracted bounds of influence and use- 
fulness. On the contrary, we should be ever looking to the exten- 
sion and development of our enterprise. It may be advisable to 
draw up a pledge roll, upon which each one of our associates will 
guarantee to introduce one new member or more. If a combined 
effort were made, the labor would not be great to any individual, 
and the aggregate addition to our ranks would be very great. 

The Directors have been fully impressed with the importance 
of securing more commodious and attractive rooms, and have made 
many, but thus far ineffectual, endeavors to accomplish so desira- 
ble an object. While this measure would entail increased expense, 
it cannot be doubted that great numbers would be added to our 
list of subscribers, and a new impulse be given to our Society and 

its objects. 

The possession of an ample Conversation Boom would add 
much to the social advantages of our Association, and, in my mind, 
this characteristic deserves special aid for its development. Our 
limited accommodations have ever served as a bar to friendly in- 
tercourse among associates. More liberal accommodations would 
also admit the formation of classes or clubs for practice and enjoy- 
ment in debates, and the contribution and reading of essays and 
literary compositions by members, and, to our younger associates, 
the advantages of such recreations would be very great. 

It is the earnest wish of the warm friends of our enterprise, 
that a more general interest, social, literary, and progressive, should 
be awakened, and that the affairs of the Association should be 
participated in by the associates at large, as well as by the board 
of management. 

It is my duty to chronicle the liberal donation of five hundred 
dollars, given to the Association by William II. Aspinwall, Esq., 



10 

of New York, on the occasion of his visit to this country last snminer. 

Our late worthy and efficient Librarian, Mr. Horace Davis, re- 
signed his post in December last, and Mr. E. De Sola was appoint- 
ed by the Board of Directors as his successor. I take pleasure in 
recommending this gentleman as every way entitled to your confi- 
dence and approval, and also bear testimony to the faithfulness of 
his assistant, Mr. John J. Tayker. 

The gentlemen of the Direction, with whom I have enjoyed a 
year of genial intercourse, are entitled to my warmest thanks, and 
to yours, gentlemen associates, for their assiduous zeal in our com- 
mon cause, and I have, moreover, occasion to thank you all, gentle- 
men, for your cordial support and cooperation. 

In closing, gentlemen, I congratulate yon upon the prosper- 
ous condition of your Association at the close of this official year. 
"With a larger net balance in the Treasury, all debts paid, than 
we have ever yet had, being some $2,000 — with a Library of 
books and a membership roll much increased over any previous 
period — the lecture project, (so long doubtful,) successfully carried 
out — the reading of our members doubled since last year — and 
all this during a twelve-month of general commercial and financial 
embarrassment, you certainly have just cause for pleasure in the 
success which has marked the growth of the pioneer library insti- 
tution of the great and growing metropolis of the Pacific. But 
your chief source of pleasure and pride, is not that our institution 
is now of commanding importance and influence — it is not that 
our small Library is any reservoir of intellectual and moral waters 
wherewith to cleanse and refresh the present sad and proverbial 
defilement of our social and political body as a people — it is not 
that we, gentlemen, are sensible of deriving from, or conferring 
by, our Association, more than a moderate degree of social and 
intellectual enjoyment — but it is, that you have laid the founda- 
tion of a future great and beneficent institution, and have demon- 
strated its continued success, its rapid and healthful growth, and 
that your prophetic eye penetrates the dim haze in the great future 
of our Western World, and sees the temple which your hands have 
erected, rising higher and yet higher into the atmosphere of a new 
and reformed, a clearer and purer intellectual and social life, still 
bearing upon its pediment the aspiring motto — Excelsioe. 

HENKY M. HALE, 

President Mercantile Library Association. 



FOUKTH 



ANNUAL REPORT 



OF THE 



PRESIDENT 



OF THE 




erantile Jikarg %ssmniht f 



OF SAN FRANCISCO, 



WITH A LIST OF OFFICERS FOR 1857-58. 



SAN FRANCISCO: 

WHITTON, TOWNE & CO'S EXCELSIOR STEAM PRESSES, 

NO. 151 CLAY STREET, NEAR MONTGOMERY. 

1857. 



LIST OF OFFICERS, 



IFOIR 1857-58 



-•4— •••—»- 



IRA P. RANKIN. 
ANDREW W. McKEE. JULES DAVID. 

H. D. OLIPHANT. J. M. SHOTWELL. 

P. VERPLANCK, Jr. T. J. LAMB, 

C. H. RAYMOND, GEOKGE HOWES, 

M. J. BURKE, WM. ARRINGTON, 

SAMUEL HUBBARD, BENJ.- HAYNES, 

W. F. PARKER. 



ANNUAL REPORT. 



Gentlemen of the Mercantile Library Association: 

In compliance with Sec. 4 of Art. vn of the Constitution, it 
becomes my duty to report to you "the general doings of the 
Association for the past year, and to suggest such measures 
for your consideration as may seem best calculated to promote 
its future success and prosperity." In the performance of 
this, my last official act of duty in connection with the office 
you did me the honor to confer upon me, permit me first, to 
warmly congratulate you upon the unexampled success of 
our young Association, and the proud position it has attained 
in the short space of four years, among the literary institu- 
tions of the country. The little bantling, whose infant 
footsteps you guided and directed with so much care, has 
become a strong and vigorous youth, who is pushing hope- 
fully yet boldly forward, to a long career of manhood and 
usefulness. 

The establishment of Mercantile Library Associations in 
our sister cities at the East, has ever been attended with 
difficulties and discouragements at the outset, and there is 
not one among them all whose early history can show, at the 



same stage of progress, a more satisfactory result than is 
presented by your institution to-day. You have had many 
serious difficulties to contend with, and many obstacles to 
overcome in your up-hill course ; but you have manfully 
struggled with them all, and your labors and exertions have 
been satisfactorily rewarded. 

The whole number of books withdrawn from the library 
by readers during the past year was 10,466, classified as 
follows, viz : 

Romance, 4,548 

Biography, 1,157 , 

Travels, 1,422 

rfistory, 922 

Belles Lettres, 789 

Arts and Sciences, 341 , 

Poetry, 404 

Law and Politics, 117 

Religion, 69 

Bound Periodicals, 2G2 

Miscellaneous, 435 



or about 


43 


per 


cent. 


a 


11 


u 


u 


a 


14 


a 


« 


u 


9 


u 


« 


a 


8 


a 


u 


a 


3 


u 


a 


it 


4 


(I 


a 


a 


1 


u 


a 


less than 


1 


u 


u 


or about 


2 1-2 


u 


« 


4 


per 


cent. 



Total, 10,466 volumes. 

Showing an increase over the previous year of 2,099 — the 
number of books withdrawn during that year having been 
8,367. The delivery of books from the Library was neces- 
sarily suspended during about one-half the month of Decem- 
ber, in consequence of the removal, etc. ; or the result would 
have shown a still larger increase than is here reported. It 
displays as it is, however, a most gratifying state of affairs, 
showing an increasing interest in the institution on the part 
of its members, and a steadily increasing taste for intellec- 
tual pursuits in our community generally. 

The number of books added to the library during the 
past year, by purchase and donations, was 2,302 volumes. 



The whole number of books now on the shelves of the 
library is 6,135, classified as follows, viz : 



Romance, 730 

Biography, 398 

Travels, 407 

History, 431 

Belles Lettres, 391 

Arts and Sciences, 386 



Poetry, 287 

Law and Politics, 340 

Religion, 274 

Bound Periodicals, 682 

Miscellaneous, 526 

Newspapers, bound, 73 



Scott's Lectures, 362 

There are likewise from four to five hundred valuable pam- 
phlets, embracing statistical reports, etc., many of them 
relating to California, all of which possess more or less inter- 
est for the general reader. 

The reading rooms are supplied with the best and latest 
atlases, globes, etc.; the books of reference are so arranged 
as to be at all times accessible to the readers, and the walls 
of the rooms and halls are hung with many valuable maps 
and engravings, besides a beautiful collection of paintings, 
nearly one hundred in number, which I shall hereafter refer to. 

One hundred and twenty newspapers, from all parts of the 
world and in many different languages, are on file in the 
reading and conversation rooms ; and the tables are regu- 
larly furnished with upwards of forty magazines, reviews 
and periodicals. In the smoking and conversation room 
tables for chess, draughts and backgammon are provided for 
the amusement of the members, which add much to the 
attractive features of the institution. 

The library, though carefully and judiciously selected, is 
still sadly deficient in several classes of literature, and to 
this subject I beg particularly to call the early attention 
of the new Board of Directors. The collection of standard 
works of modern fiction and romance is entirely inadequate 
to the demands of the readers. By a reference to the sta- 



tistics before related, you will observe that the proportion 
of this class of books in the library, numbering 730 in all, 
is but about twelve per cent; while the number withdrawn 
by readers is about forty-three per cent., being 4,548 vol- 
umes. I would therefore recommend a material increase in 
this department, and also a considerable increase in the de- 
partments of history, arts and sciences and travels. 

Much care and attention has been bestowed upon the 
preservation and binding of regular files of the San Fran- 
cisco daily newspapers, seventy-three volumes of which are 
now upon your shelves. There is no estimating the immense 
prospective importance of this department of your library, 
increasing in value and interest as it naturally must from 
year to year ; and I trust it may be carefully cherished by 
each succeeding administration. The present collection 
comprises files, nearly complete, of every newspaper which 
has ever been or is now published in San Francisco, present- 
ing a mirror of passing events which will be invaluable to 
the future historian of California, and of the deepest inter- 
est to all. 

The following statistics will serve to show you the condi- 
tion of the Library at the end of the year, commencing with 
the period of its organization in January, 1853. The nucle- 
us of the Library was formed at that time by the purchase 
of the private library of General Hitchcock, numbering in 
all some 1,500 volumes. 

No. of vols, at date of First Annual Keport, January, 1854,. . 2705, 

No. " " Second " " " 1855,.. 3315. 

No. " " Third " " " 1856,.. 3833. 

No. " " Fourth " " " 1857,.. 6135. 

These figures certainly show a highly gratifying result 
and speak most encouragingly for the future. In your pres- 
ent prosperous condition, and with your increased and in- 



creasing facilities, there is every reason to believe that your 
Library will contain nearly ten thousand volumes, at the 
date of your next annual report. 

Many valuable donations have been made to the Library 
during the past year. The following are the names of some 
of those to whom we are thus indebted ; — to one and all of 
whom I would here tender, in behalf of the Association, my 
warmest thanks for their substantial liberality, and for the 
kindly feelings they have ever evinced for the best interests 
and welfare of our institution. 



Wm. Gouverneur Morris 

T. S. Miller 

Bishop Kipp 

H. C. Beals 

Capt. Wm. MacMichael 

Hon. P. A. Roach 

P. Dillon, late Consul of France 

Hon. J. A. McDougal 

E. H. Howard 

J. McMullen 

Hon. J. B. Weller 

J. Hastings Grant 

Hon. P. T. Herbert 

T. Boyce 

Hon. J. W. Denver 

Hon. David S. Douglass 

W. D. Bagley 

H. H. Moore 

Rev. Dr. Scott 

Capt. Madison 

M. M. Noah 

C. L. Tucker 

C. Suarez 

James Linen 

C. J. Dempster 

W. R. Wadsworth 

T. F. Mitchell 



L. L. Blood 

C. S. West 

Dr. C. H. Raymond 
E. H. Hale 
Henry Johnson 
J. A. Ferris 
J. W. Shoemaker 

E. De Sola 
Professor Bache 

F. Vassault 
J. R. West 
J. C. Davis 
J. S. Hittell 
J. H. Purkett 
M. A. Breed 

D. E. Webb 

J. H. Gardiner 

S. Colville 

Messrs. Barry & Patten 

D. W. Chauncey 

H. D. Oliphant 

H. M. Hale 

Henry La Reintrie 

T. O. Larkin 

Hon. R. C. Winthrop 

Benj. Haynes 

G. & C. Merriam, Springfield 



8 



W. E. Brown Chamber of Commerce, S. Fran. 

Mercantile Library Association of Cincinnati. 
" Alta California" newspaper, and the city and country press generally. 

The whole number of members belonging to the Associa- 
tion at the present time is 1250 viz : 

Life Members 84 Share' Holders 554 

Honorary Members 62 Subscribing Members . . . 550 

Total, 1250 

Showing an increase of about three hundred and fifty 
members since the date of the last annual report. As the 
collections for the present quarter have not yet been com- 
pleted, it is impossible to report the exact number of paying 
members, but from a careful estimate made up from the 
books it may safely be put down at eight hundred and fifty, 
which will make the revenue of the present quarter for dues 
alone, from present members, $2,550 ; add to which the 
estimated amount to be paid for initiation fees and dues by 
new members during the quarter, say $450, and the quar- 
terly revenue will amount to $3000. 

The whole number of members who have enjoyed the 
privileges of the Association since the date of its organi- 
zation is 1486. 

The estimated current expenses of the institution will 
amount to about $650 per month, or $1,950 per quarter, 
leaving a clear surplus of $1,050 per quarter, after paying 
all expenses ; which amount may be entirely appropriated to 
the purchase of books. 

The total amount of receipts, from all sources, by the 
Treasurer, during the year, including a balance of $1,896 41, 
transferred at the commencement of the year by the former 
Treasurer, was $12,196 41 

Total amount of disbursements for the year 8,989 27 

Leaving a cash balance in the hands of the 
Treasurer of $3,207 14 



9 



In addition to this amount there is a balance of cash in 
the hands of the Librarian of $250; a due bill, for account 
of Life Membership, of $50 ; and a balance of over $400 
yet to be collected from members, for dues for the present 
quarter; making a grand total of about $4000, now at the 
disposition of the incoming Board of Directors, $2,000 of 
which, I would recommend, should be immediately remitted 
to your agent in New York for the purchase of books. 

The following named gentlemen have become Life Mem- 
bers of the Association since the date of the last annual 
report :' 

George O. Whitney Wm. R. Garrison 

George Hudson H. H. Halleck 



i .- v 



Wm. Gouverneur Morris Wm. M. Burgoyne 

Henry M. Hale W. C. Ralston 

J. H. Coghill H. C. Macy 

Jonas B. Clark H. S. Gates, M. D. 

Samuel J. Hensley G. W. Beaver 

J. P. Raymond J. Gennella, Jr. 

W. A. Gibbons Urban P. Hutchings 

J. Mora Moss A. L. Tubbs 

Theodore F. Moss G. B. Post 

I. H. Ham John Roach 

N. B. Dilhorn Wm. H. Talmage. 

The increasing extent of the library and the constant 
accessions to its list of members during the past year, ren- 
dered it absolutely imperative that more extended accom- 
modations should be provided to meet the growing wants of 
the institution. The rooms in Montgomery Block, which 
were amply spacious at the period of their first occupation, 
for the small library and its limited number of readers at 
that day, were found to be entirely inadequate to accommo- 
date the increasing requirements. More room was required 
for library shelving, and a much larger space was needed to 
properly dispose of the newspaper and periodical literature, 



10 



and to comfortably accommodate the increased number of 
visiters who crowded the reading rooms. With this view a 
committee, consisting of Messrs. Coghill, Oliphant, Bailey, 
Howard and Kittle, was appointed in October last by the 
Board of Directors, to search for more suitable quarters. 
The committee found it a difficult task to perform, to pro- 
cure, in a central position, the requisite accommodations at 
a rate of rental that would come within the limited means of 
the institution. Several propositions were received from 
property holders, and among others one from Messrs. Pioche, 
Bayerque & Co., which was accepted by the Board, the 
result of which was the leasing of the spacious and beautiful 
rooms, now occupied by the Association, for the term of two 
years, from the 15th December, 1856, at a rent of $175 per 
month. Immediate steps were taken for the properly fitting 
up and furnishing the new apartments, which had been 
placed at the disposition of the committee some ten days 
before the commencement of the term of the lease ; and on 
the 16th of December the rooms were thrown open to the 
members, and to our fellow citizens generally, who were 
invited to visit them. Much credit is due to the committee 
before named, for the careful, judicious and tasteful perform- 
ance of the duties devolved upon them. They deserve, and 
I am sure they will receive, the warmest thanks of the 
Association. 

For the many beautiful works of art which embellish the 
rooms you are indebted to a number of our public spirited 
and generous hearted citizens, who feel a deep interest in 
the success of your institution. The Hon. V. I. Fourgeaud 
has entrusted to the care of the Association his entire pri- 
vate collection of paintings and some rare bronzes, collected 
by himself during his recent visit to Europe. Some of the 
paintings are of great value and add much to the attractive 



11 



features of the rooms. The large and valuable picture rep- 
resenting the interior of the United States House of Repre- 
sentatives in 1822, was deposited by W. C. Annan, Esq. 
This painting was executed by Professor Morse, the man 
who has since won immortal honors for himself and his coun- 
try, by the invention of the electric telegraph, and is highly 
interesting as a great national historical picture. The like- 
nesses of the members of the House, painted from life, are 
said to be strikingly correct, and the painting has received 
much commendation as a work of art both in Europe and 
America. The large full length picture of Washington, 
copied from Stuart's original painting, by the daughter of 
the artist, was deposited by R. I. Stevens, Esq. ; and Charles 
Carl, Esq. has deposited an exquisite original painting by 
Nahl, which has won the admiration of all who have seen it. 
In addition to these interesting objects which have been 
entrusted to your care, there have also been some valuable 
donations of works of art to the Association, during the past 
year ; among which are the four beautiful steel engravings, 
india proofs, copied from " Cole's Voyage of Life," presented 
by the Rev. G. Abbott, of New York, through his friend, the 
Rev. S. H. Willey of this city. Col. Joseph Grant has like- 
wise presented to the Association the full length portrait of 
Murdock in the character of Hamlet, which adorns the walls 
of the conversation room. This picture is from the pencil of 
"W. S. Jewett, Esq., of this city, who is also finishing a por- 
trait of the late James King of Wm., which he intends pre- 
senting to the Association when completed. Messrs. W. H. 
Stevens, Cakes & Muygridge, Wells, Fargo & Co., Charles 
P. Fenderich, Esq., and others, have also presented a number 
of valuable paintings and engravings. 

You have now within your rooms the nucleus of a Gallery 
of Fine Arts, and it should be your care to encourage its 



12 



increase by every means in your power. I would suggest 
that a general invitation be extended to California artists to 
deposit in your rooms their various works of art on exhibi- 
tion and sale, and you may thus do much to encourage Art 
while you will be gradually refining and improving the pub- 
lic taste. 

In connection with this subject there is another feature I 
wish to suggest for your consideration, and which I deem 
it important should be adopted and introduced at an early 
day, and which, when once fairly engrafted on your system, 
must be powerful for good among the younger members of 
the Association. I have reference to the formation of classes, 
from among the members of the Association, for Penman- 
ship, Book-keeping, Drawing, Elocution, the ancient and 
modern Languages, etc. The plan has been adopted with 
great success by kindred associations in the Eastern cities, 
and I have no doubt it would meet with equal favor and 
success here in California. Young men of limited means 
may thus be enabled at a very trifling expense to perfect 
themselves in any of the branches of education wherein they 
may be deficient. All the various branches might be thus 
acquired at an expense about equivalent to the cost of any 
one of them studied separately by an individual student. 
Liberal arrangements can be made with the necessary pro- 
fessors to conduct the classes, and ample accommodations can 
be obtained by them on the third floor of the building now 
occupied by the Association. The inauguration of this new 
feature could not but have the tendency to largely increase 
the number of members, as its privileges would of course be 
confined exclusively to members of the Association. I trust 
you will give this subject the serious consideration its im- 
portance demands, for I believe there are hundreds of young 
men who would be gladly willing to enroll their names upon 



13 



your list of members could this additional inducement be 
offered to them. 

It is confidently believed, that with proper exertions, the 
number of members may be doubled during the coming year, 
and it lies with you, gentlemen, to determine whether or not 
so important a result shall be consummated. It requires 
but a little energetic action on your part and the work is 
accomplished. I do not believe there is one among you, 
who could not, from his own immediate circle of acquaint- 
ance find one candidate for membership, and some of you, I 
am confident, with well-directed exertion could procure a 
dozen. In furtherance of this object I would suggest that a 
certificate of Life Membership, the value of which is one 
hundred dollars, be awarded as a premium to the one who 
shall introduce the largest number of new members into the 
Association, prior to the first day of July next. This meas- 
ure would have a tendency to create a little feeling of gen- 
erous rivalry, and could not but be productive of good 
results, and if it operates as favorably for the interests of the 
institution as I believe it will, it would be well, occasionally 
to repeat the experiment. 

Your former Librarian, Mr. E. De Sola was compelled to 
resign his position, early in the year, much to the regret of 
the Board of Directors, on account of urgent business mat- 
ters at the East, and it became necessary to look about for 
some competent gentleman to fill the vacancy. So large a 
number of applications were received in answer to a call 
published in the newspapers, and the applicants all present- 
ed such strong claims to the position, it became a matter of 
no little difficulty to decide upon their respective merits. 
After much serious consideration by the Board of Directors, 
who carefully canvassed the qualifications of the numerous 
candidates, they awarded the office to the present incumbent, 



14 



Mr. H. H. Moore, who has fulfilled the arduous, duties of the 
position with great credit to himself, and to the entire satis- 
faction, I believe, of every member of the Association. 

The Assistant Librarian, John J. Tayker, who has been 
your faithful servant almost from the first day of your organ- 
ization, has been suffering from a severe illness for several 
weeks past, and it became necessary to employ a temporary 
substitute to perform his duties. I am happy, however, 
to report to you that his health is now rapidly improv- 
ing, and he will soon be enabled to resume his position. 
Should it become necessary to employ the services of a 
Second Assistant — and I think the increasing business of the 
library will at once demand it — you will find the present 
acting Assistant, above referred to, Mr. Daniel E. Webb, in 
every way qualified, I believe, for the office. 

The Lectures of the present course, now in progress be- 
fore the Association, have been of a most interesting charac- 
ter and have been attended by highly intellectual and ap- 
preciative audiences. The course consists of eight Lectures, 
six of which have been already delivered, as follows, viz : 

I. December 15th. By Hon. Harry I. Thornton. Sub- 
ject — " The intimate connection and the mutual dependence 

of the various occupations of Man." 

II. December 22nd. By Dr. F. P. Wierzeckt. Subject — 
" The beautiful in poetry and the poetic in the beautiful." 

III. December 30th. By Be v. W. A. Scott. Subject — 
"Arabia, the Arabs and Mount Sinai," 

IV. January 7th. By E. G. Buffum, Esq. Subject — 
" Types, Ink and Paper." 

V. January 13th. By Wm. H. Rhodes, Esq., (Caxton.) 
Subject — " The Pacific Ocean, in its relations to the North- 
west Coast of America." 

VI. January 22nd. By Hon. Thos. W. Freelon. Sub- 



15 



ject — " Some characteristics of the latest school of English 
Romance and Poetry." 

Two more Lectures, which will complete the course, are 
yet to be delivered. One by Professor McCullough, on 
Chemistry, on the evening of the 29th of the present month, 
and the other by the Hon. Milton S. Latham, on the 6th 
February, the subject of which latter lecture has not yet been 
announced to the Committee. 

The annual election for officers of the Association for the 
ensuing year, was held on Wednesday, 21st December, inst., 
the day of election having been postponed by resolution, 
from the Monday previous. The whole number of votes 
polled was 860 ; and a spirited rivalry was evinced by the 
numerous friends of the opposing candidates for the various 
offices. The following named gentlemen, composing the 
regular ticket presented by the nominating committee, were 
duly elected. 

President, IRA P. RANKIN. 

Vice President, ANDREW McKEE. 

Treasurer, JULES DAVID. 

Recording Secretary,. ... H. D. OLIPH ANT. 
Corresponding Secretary,. J. M. SHOT WELL. 

Directors. 
F. J. Lippitt, George Howes, 

Benj. Haynes, Phillip Verplanck, 

Dr. C. H. Raymond, T. J. Lamb, 

M. J. Burke, William Arrington, 

Samuel Hubbard. 

The occurrence of this election, and the renewed interest 
thereby awakened in our community in behalf of the insti- 
tution, has had the happy effect of adding nearly two hun- 
dred names to your list of members, whose fees of initiation 
and quarterly dues, together with numerous arrearages paid 



16 



by delinquent members, amount nearly to the sum of two 
thousand dollars ; a most gratifying result for the interests of 
the Association, and an unmistakable evidence of its increas- 
ing popularity. 

In reviewing the history of our institution, gentlemen, for 
the past four years, you have just cause of honest pride in 
the success which has crowned your labors. Much has been 
accomplished, but, gentlemen, much remains to be done. The 
population of our city numbers some sixty thousand, a very 
large proportion of which is composed of young men, for 
whose particular benefit and improvment this institution was 
especially designed. By the liberal policy you have in your 
wisdom adopted, the advantages it offers may be cheaply 
enjoyed by all classes of the community, and I am confident 
these advantages need but to be properly known and under- 
stood, to insure you a list of members which will soon be 
numbered by thousands. Every additional member joining 
your Association adds to its revenue, and consequently adds 
to its means of usefulness. For a long space of time the 
revenue of the institution barely covered its necessary ex- 
penses, but you have now an income which will leave you a 
liberal annual surplus, so that every additional dollar of rev- 
enue may be appropriated for the increase of your library. 

Go on then with the good work before you. You are 
engaged in a noble cause, one worthy of your best energies. 
Let your constant efforts be employed in behalf of the 
Association, — to extend the area of its usefulness, and to 
add to its mines of intellectual wealth ; and you will be 
amply repaid for your labors, not only by the immediate 
personal advantages which will mutually accrue to your 
selves, but by the heartfelt thanks of thousands who will 
come after you, and who will enjoy the benefits of an insti- 
tution reared for them by your wisdom and liberality. 



17 



And, now, gentlemen, in laying down the scepter of office, 
and resigning to my successor the proud position it has been 
my honor to hold for the past twelve months, believe me, 
when I say to you that I do so with no slight feelings of 
regret ; a regret, however, which is more than compensated 
by the feeling of pleasure and satisfaction I experience in 
knowing that the mantle of office falls upon the shoulders of 
one so eminently qualified to wear and to adorn it. Permit 
me, at the same time, to express to you my acknowledg- 
ments for the kindly courtesies I have ever experienced at 
your hands ; and to the Board of Directors, with whom it 
has been my happy privilege to have been so intimately 
associated, my warmest thanks, in your behalf, for their 
constant and unremitting attention to the duties which 
devolved upon them. To one and all of them I am deeply 
indebted, personally, for the kind partiality they have ever 
extended to me as their presiding officer, and I beg to assure 
them, that the term of our official connection forms an epoch 
in my life, which shall ever be remembered with feelings of 
sincere st pleasure. 

FRED'K A. WOODWORTH, President. 
San Francisco, January 23, 1857. 
3 



REGULATIONS OF THE LIBRARY. 



Section 1. The Library shall be open every day throughout the 
year, from 10 o'clock, A.M., to 10 o'clock, P.M., excepting Sundays, the 
Fourth of July, Thanksgiving Day, Christinas and New Year. 

Sec. 2. The Librarian shall keep a full and accurate Catalogue of 
all the Books, Magazines, Maps, Charts and Works of Art belonging to 
the Association, and arrange them in proper order ; he shall make a 
record of all books and other donations presented to the Association, in a 
book provided for that purpose, with the names of the donors, and make 
suitable acknowledgments of the same. 

Sec. 3. He shall register in a book prepared for that purpose, and to 
be kept in the Libraiy Room, the name of each member of this Associa- 
tion ; and shall in no case deliver a book to any member, until the name 
of such member shall have been so registered. 

Sec. 4. He shall enter in a book to be kept for that purpose, the title 
of every volume delivered by him ; the name of the person to whom 
delivered ; the time of taking and returning the same ; together with the 
forfeitures arising from every default. 

Sec. 5. He shall collect all dues and forfeitui-es incurred by the mem- 
bers, and account for the same to the Treasurer, as herein before provided. 

Sec. 6. He shall submit to the Board of Directors a monthly report, 
stating the amount of moneys received and expended by him, report the 
names of such members as may refuse to pay their dues and forfeitures, 
or lose or damage any book belonging to the Library ; the names of all 
delinquents, with the amount of dues remaining unpaid ; and recommend 
the adoption of such measures as he may judge necessary for the greater 
efficiency and usefulness of the Association. 

Sec. 7. He shall suffer no person, excepting members of the Board, 
to remove a book from its place in the Library without his permission. 

Sec. 8. He shall replace the books in proper order upon the shelves, 
as soon as may be after they are returned, having first examined them 
with care, and ascertained whether they have been injured or defaced. 

Sec. 9. He shall see that the Books, Library and Reading Room are 
kept in good order ; he shall duly observe the instructions which may be 



19 



given him by the Board of Directors, and take care that the regulations 
relative to the loaning of books be strictly adhered to. 

Sec. 10. He shall ascertain, during the months of January, April, 
July and October, by examination of the account of each member, the 
book or books not then returned to the Library ; and shall cause the same 
to be procured of the member in default. 

Sec. 11. He shall deliver to any member applying personally, or to 
his written order, one volume, if it be a folio or quarto ; and two, if 
an octavo, or duodecimo, or volume of less size. 

Sec. 12. Every member may detain each book or set delivered as 
aforesaid, if it be a folio or quarto, four weeks ; an octavo, three weeks ; 
or a book or set of less size, two weeks ; except new publications, which, 
until they have been in the Library two months, shall not be detained — 
an oetavo longer than two weeks, and books of less size one week, and 
which shall not be renewed. No book shall be reserved by the Librarian 
for any director or member. 

Sec. 13. Any member who shall detain a book or set longer than the 
time above limited, respectively, shall forfeit and pay to the Librarian 
for every day a volume is so detained, if it be a folio, twenty cents ; a 
quarto, fifteen cents ; an octavo, ten cents ; if it be a duodecimo, or smaller 
volume or pamphlet, five cents. 

Sec. 14. If any member lose or injure a book, he shall make the same 
good to the Librarian ; and if the book lost or injured be one of a set, he 
shall pay to the Librarian, for the use of the Association, the full value of 
said set, and may thereupon receive the remaining volumes as his prop- 
erty. 

Sec. 15. No member shall be permitted to receive a book from the 
Library until he shall have paid all sums due from him to the Association, 
and made good all damages and losses which he may have occasioned. 

Sec. 16. Books of Reference, and such others as may from time to 
time be specially designated by the Board, shall not be taken from the 
Library, except by special permission of a member of the Board of Direc- 
tors ; provided, however, that Newspapers, Encyclopaedias, Cyclopaedias, 
Dictionaries and Atlases, shall in no case be taken from the Library 
Rooms. 

Sec. 17. Any member wishing to withdraw from the Association, 
must inform the Librarian of it, see that his resignation is registered, and 
pay up his dues and fees, else he will be considered as continuing a mem- 
ber, and charged accordingly, unless otherwise ordered by the Board of 
Directors. 



REGULATIONS OF THE READING ROOM. 



Section 1. The Reading Room shall be opened every day through- 
out the year, from 9 o'clock, a.m., to 10 o'clock, r.M. 

Sec. 2. Loud conversation and smoking shall not be allowed, except 
in the room set apart for those purposes. 

Sec. 3. No member will be allowed to remain in the Library or Read- 
ins: Room with his hat on. 

Sec. 4. No member shall assume the liberty of arranging the books 
of the Library, or periodicals on the tables, or of performing any of the 
duties that devolve upon the Librarian. 

Sec. o. None but members shall be allowed the privilege of the Read- 
ing Room, unless introduced by a member of the Association. 

Sec. 6. Any member may have the privilege of introducing a friend, 
not a resident of the city, whose name shall be registered by the Librarian 
in a book kept for that purpose, and who shall receive a ticket of admis- 
sion to the Reading Room for the term of four weeks. 

Sec. 7. No member shall be allowed the privilege of the Reading 
Room, unless all dues and forfeitures incurred are liquidated. 

Sec. 8. No member shall be allowed to remove papers from the files, 
or books, plates, or periodicals from the Reading Room. 

Sec. 9. Any member who shall mutilate the periodicals or papers 
placed on the files or tables in the Reading Room, or remove them there- 
from, shall be liable to fine and expulsion. 

Sec. 10. No member, except of the Board of Directors, shall be 
allowed inside the Bar of the Library Room. 

Sec. 11. The Reading Room may be occupied exclusively by ladies 
and gentlemen accompanying ladies, between the hours of 12 and 2, p.m. 

Sec. 12. Should a member transgress any article in these Regula- 
tions, he shall be reported to the Board of Directors, who may take such 
measures thereon as they may deem expedient. 

Sec. 13. The Regulations of the Library and Reading Room shall 
not be altered, amended, or suspended, unless by the votes of six mem- 
bers of the Board of Directors, present at a stated meeting, notice being 
given for that purpose. 



FIFTH 



ANNUAL REPORT 



OF THE 



PRESIDENT 



OF THE 



Jtontile Jikarg g^sonahmt, 



OIF S-A.3ST FRANCISCO. 



WITH A LIST OF OFFICERS FOR 1858-59. 



SAN FRANCISCO: 

WHITTON, TOWNE & CO'S EXCELSIOR STEAM PRESSES, 

No. 125 CLAY STREET, CORNER OF SANSOME. 

1858. 



LIST OF OFFICERS, 



FOR 1858-59, 



< mmm > 



E. H. WASHBURN. 



JOSEPH A. DONAHOE. 



JOSEPH M. SHOTWELL. 



MworMflig H>f curtate, 
SAM'L HUBBARD. 



B. WATKINS LEIGH. 



Stoertons, 

A. L. TUBBS, JULIUS K. ROSE, 

C. H. RAYMOND, ALBERT MILLER, 

THOMAS S. MILLER, R. B. SWAIN, 
JOSEPH S. PAXSON, P. T. SOUTHWORTH, 
JACOB B. MOORE. 



ANNUAL REPORT. 



Gentlemen of the Mercantile Library Association: 

It has become my duty, under the Constitution, to present the Fifth 
Annual Report of the Association ; to give a brief statement of its 
condition and progress, and offer such hints as may seem to me import- 
ant in regard to its future policy and management. 

I am happy to be able to report a year, on the whole, of greater 
prosperity than has been enjoyed in any similar period of our brief 

history. 

The whole number of books drawn from the Library during the past 
year, was 17,528, against 10,466 in the previous year— an increase 
of 7,062 volumes, equal to 67^ per cent. 

The classification of the books withdrawn is as follows, viz : 

Romance, 9674 Biography, 1549 

Travels, 2077 History, 1259 

Belle Lettres, 858 Arts and Sciences, 558 

Poetry, 505 Law and Politics, 126 

Religion, 100 Bound Periodicals, 177 

Miscellaneous, 645 

Total, 17528 

The smallest number of volumes drawn in any one month was in 
January, 1324, and the largest in August, 1637. 

While the membership has not increased during the year, this large 
increase in the number of readers must show either the stronger inter- 
est taken in the institution, the improving taste for the means of intel- 



6 



lectual and literary culture, or the better facilities afforded by the 
Library for the gratification of such a taste. 

The Library at the present time contains 8,447 volumes, classified 
as follows, viz : 

Bomance, 1480 Biography, 683 

Travels, 762 History, 789 

Belle Leltres, 661 Arts and Sciences, 630 

Poetry, 388 Law and Politics, 475 

Eeligion, 289 Bound Periodicals, 836 

Miscellaneous, 989 Bound Newspapers, 105 

i Scott's Lectures, 360 

Total, 8447 

The number of books in the Library at the date of the last Annual 
Report, was 6,135 ; so that we show an increase during the year of 
2,312. Many of these are standard works, of comparatively high cost, 
and all of them, I believe, add to the attractions of the Library. Be- 
sides the books above enumerated, a large number of pamphlets, many 
of which will hereafter prove very valuable, have been added to the 
Library, chiefly by donations. 

It has been the aim of the Directors that the Reading Room should 
at least lose none of its attractions for those members of the Associa- 
tion who are accustomed to make it a place of resort. A large number 
of the leading newspapers published in the principal cities of the 
United States, and in different sections of the country ; several of the 
leading foreign journals ; the principal English and American Quar- 
terlies ; and most of the Monthlies, are received regularly, and may 
be found on file or on the tables of the Reading Room. The Room is 
also supplied with many valuable books of reference, and art. 

The Smoking and Conversation Room is found by experience to be 
a most attractive, and therefore useful feature of the institution. It 
appearing that sufficient facilities were not afforded to accommodate 
all who resorted to the Rooms for the purpose of playing chess, a num- 
ber of very handsome tables have been added during the year to those 
already in use, and in the evening they are rarely unoccupied. 

A reference to the last Annual Report will show that in accordance 
with the recommendation of the retiring President, the number of books 
in the department of Romance has been more than doubled within the 
year. In making the disproportionate increase in that department, it 
will be seen by the statement already given, that the Directors have 



been quite justified by the demands of members for that class of litera- 
ture. It appears that within the year the number of volumes of Ro- 
mance withdrawn, is equal to a withdrawal of every volume in that 
department nearly seven times. While, therefore, the additions made 
in this department cannot be considered the most valuable permanent 
additions to the Library, many of the books being of an ephemeral 
character, still as the institution is a popular one, and must depend for 
its success and prosperity upon the popular favor, it will be the duty 
of the government, while the taste already indicated exists, to supply 
it with needful aliment. To this end, an arrangement has been made 
with Messrs. Wiley & Halstead, of New York, by which, in addition 
to the orders sent forward for specific books, they are authorised to 
send us at once, without order, single, duplicate, and sometimes tripli- 
cate copies of new and popular works as they come out. 

Yet while the government are bound thus to consult the taste of the 
body of members of the Association, still it seems to me to be their 
duty with wise forecast to make such additions, and to as great an 
extent as a fair division of the means at their disposal will permit, of 
such classes of works of standard character as will have permanent value, 
and give increased dignity and usefulness to the institution. 

It should be borne in mind that owing to the peculiar formation 
and immaturity of California society, the membership of our Associa- 
tion differs very considerably from that of Associations called by the 
same name in the older communities of the Atlantic States. In New 
York, Boston, or Philadelphia, in addition to " Mercantile Libraries," 
there are University, Historical Society, or Athenaeum Libraries, 
furnishing special facilities for the researches of scholars and profes- 
sional men. Here, however, the membership of our Association is by 
no means confined to the mercantile community, but comprises also 
mechanics, men of leisure, and members of all the learned professions. 
Our Library is the principal one upon the Pacific coast, and probably 
will long continue to be so. To as great an extent as its facilities 
afford, will it be resorted to for reference and investigation in all the 
specialities of professional life, and antiquarian or scientific research. 
Indeed, it is a most gratifying circumstance, that already such facilities 
are afforded to a moderate extent, and that there are many who gladly 
avail themselves of them. 

In view, then, of the particular circumstances and facts hinted at 



8 



above, is it not desirable, as rapidly as the means of the Institution 
will permit, to add largely to the more substantial and valuable portion 
of the Library ? Without losing any of its attractions for that class of 
members who confine themselves chiefly to the reading of works of 
popular literature, would not the Institution be in the way to serve a 
higher end by additions of the character referred to ? Within the past 
year many valuable works in different departments of science have 
been added to the Library, but without, perhaps, in any instance going 
far enough to give a tolerably complete series of authorities in any 
particular department. It seems to me that such additions as would 
place upon our shelves a reasonably full selection of the standard works 
in the different departments of science, art, philosophy, and theology, 
would add greatly to the respectability, dignity, and usefulness of the 
Library. 

Let me not be understood, however, as intimating an opinion that 
our collection of books is not even now a highly respectable one. On 
the contrary, considering the circumstances under which it has been 
collected, and the age of our Institution, it must be considered highly 
creditable, and it is doubtful if in the same time any similar Association 
in the country has ever made the same progress. 

The number of volumes in the Library at the dates of the several 
Annual Reports for the past five years, has been as follows, viz : 

January 1854, 2,705 January 1856, 3,833 

1855, 3,315 " 1857, 6,135 

1858, 8,4*7 

The extent of our Library is now such as to make a well arranged 
catalogue a great desideratum, and during the past year the Chairman 
of the Library Committee, Dr. Raymond, has liberally devoted a con- 
siderable portion of his time to the arrangement of such a catalogue, 
on the plan most approved in the principal Public Libraries of the 
country, and has completed a large portion of his work. The printing 
of this catalogue will be attended with a heavy expense, but it may 
be safely assumed that most members of the Association would gladly 
buy a copy at a price which would defray the expense of publication. 
A beginning has been made in this direction by the printing of a 
catalogue of works of fiction in the Library. The whole subject is 
referred to the incoming government. 



9 



As heretofore, we have to acknowledge the kindness of many true 
friends of the Association, from whom we have received donations of 
books, manuscripts, works of art, or natural curiosities. Among those 
to whom we are thus indebted, and whose liberality we gratefully 
acknowledge, are the following gentlemen : 

W. F. Parker, 
Martin Wheat, 
S. H. Lloyd, 



T. S. Miller, 

H. C. Beals, 

Capt. Wm. MacMiehael, 

Hon. P. A. Roach, 

Hon. J. B. Weller, 

Hon. J. W. Denver, 

Hon. David S. Douglass, 

T. Boyce, 

H. H. Moore, 

Capt. Madison, 

Dr. C. H. Raymond, 

Henry Johnson & Co., 

Professor Bache, 

D. E. Webb, 

Barry & Patten, 

H. M. Hale, 

A. B. Forbes, 

Pioche, Bayerque & Co., 

J. F. Atwill, 

A. S. Marvin, 

S. E. Woodworth, 

Rev. J. E. Benton, 

Wm. R. Garrison, 

G. W. Bell, 

S. Hubbard, 

J. Hoyt, 

J. L. Langerman, 

W. Wainwright, 

H. D. Oliphant, 

D. W. Chauncey, 

J. S. Hittell, 

Wm. H. Stevens, 

Hon. R. C Winthrop, 

John Ferguson, 

R. M. Folger, 

M. W. Ballou, 

H. C. Hickok, 

S. W. Holliday, 

C. L. Weller, 

S. Pillsbury, 

J. H. Riley, 
E. Delessert, 



A. W. Thompson, 
Dr. R. McMillan, 
Dr. Horace Hawes, 
J. C. Stone, 

Dr. F. A. Holman, 
Wm. Gouverneur Morris, 
J. H. Purkett, 
Wm. Murray, 
Hon. S. J. Bridge, 
Geo. Davis, 
J. B. Crockett, 

B. W. Leigh, 
W. F. Herrick, 
Hutchings & Rosenfield, 
Epes Ellery, 

Governor of Pennsylvania, 
Regents of State of New York, 
E. E. Waterman, 
Horace Gushee, 
E. E. Smith, 

Governor of Rhode Island, 
Jas. De Fremery, 
E. J. Muygridge, 
J. S. Bovee, 
E. H. Washburn, 
Gideon Nye, Jr., Canton, 
R. Middleton, 
J. C. Davis, 
Ruckell & Dressel, 
Wells, Fargo & Co., 
Dr. H. Gibbons, 
E. Conner, 
M. E. Hughes, 
W. F. Pendleton, 
J. J. Tayker, 
Michael Castle, 
Hon. J. R. Bartlett, 
The various San Francisco Newspa- 
pers, and the country press generally. 



10 



To Mrs. E. P. Lesdernier we are under obligations for some Elocu- 
tionary Readings, which resulted in a handsome profit to the Associa- 
tion. From the Pacific Mail Steam Ship Company, the United States 
Mail Steam Ship Company, and the Panama Rail Road Company, we 
are in the receipt of a constant and most substantial favor — these 
associated Companies having liberally offered to bring all our books 
from New York gratuitously. 

The property of the Association has become so valuable that the 
Directors did not feel justified in allowing it to remain wholly subject 
to risk by fire. They have accordingly effected insurance upon it to 
the extent of $5,000, one-half the premium on which was kindly con- 
tributed to the Association by Joshua P. Haven, Esq., Agent for the 
Underwriters. 

It will become necessary, during the present year, to provide addi- 
tional space for the Library. Even now the Library Room is incon- 
veniently crowded, and with the increase of books which may reasonably 
be anticipated during the year, more room will be imperatively 
demanded. I do not see how it can be had in our present quarters, 
except by trenching somewhat on the space and accommodations of 
the Reading Room. 

With the growth of our Institution, both in respect to membership 
and increase of Library, it will not be long before our necessities will 
demand a house exclusively for our own accommodation. That time 
has, perhaps, not yet arrived, but it is a matter of so much importance 
as to be well worth keeping in mind by every member and friend of 
the Association. It is " a consummation devoutly to be wished," and 
in due time it must be accomplished. 

In the last Annual Report, reference was made to many beautiful 
works of art adorning our Rooms, either the property of the Associa- 
tion by gift, or temporarily deposited with us by the owners. The 
pictures belonging to Dr. Fourgeaud have been removed, he having left 
the city ; most, if not all, of the others are still retained. 

In this connection, permit me to call the attention of the members 
of the Association to one extremely valuable work of art, now attainable 
by a very small sacrifice on the part of a few of our members. I refer 
to Audobon's great national work, the " Birds of America." This 
work, from its beauty and importance as well as its rarity, deserves a 
place in every great public Library, and if we can secure the copy 



11 



now within our reach, we may regard ourselves as having gained a 
rich prize. The Directors have not felt justified in appropriating the 
general funds of the Association to the purchase of a single work of so 
high cost, but a private subscription has been started with the hope 
that in that way the object might be secured. The subscription now 
amounts to $400, about one-half the sum necessary. I appeal earnestly 
to the members and friends of the Association, to add to this subscrip- 
tion as they have ability, and thus enable the Directors to complete 
the purchase. 

The system of public Lectures, commenced some years since by the 
Association, is continued the present season. The commencement of 
the course has been delayed later than usual, partly on account of the 
number of lectures given earlier in the season before other Associa- 
tions, making some delay not undesirable, to avoid interference ; and 
partly to meet the convenience of the gentlemen engaged to lecture. 
The course was opened last evening, January 25th, by an able, eloquent, 
and suggestive lecture, by Joshua P. Haven, Esq. — subject, " Books 
out of the Counting Room." He will be followed by Capt. E. D. 
Keyes, Rev. R. P. Cutler, J. Ross Brown, Esq., W. W. Shepard, 
Esq., and other eminent gentlemen. 

The whole number of members at present belonging to the Associa- 
tion is 1176, distributed as follows: 

* 

Life Members, 91 Share Holders, 573 

Honorary do 62 Subscribing Members, 450 

Total, 1176 

This statement shows a decrease in the entire membership of 77, 
since the last Annual Report, which may be accounted for, however, 
by the fact that at the election last year, occurring but a few days 
before the making of the Report, an unusually strong feeling was 
enlisted in favor of rival tickets, leading to the admission of a large 
number of new members for the purpose of voting, since which many 
of this number have resigned, or allowed their membership to be 
forfeited. 

There have joined the Association since its organization in 1853, 
either as share holders, subscribing, or life members, 1,601 persons, 
and 62 have been made Honorary members during the same time. 
Of the 1,601 referred to, 570 were share holders, 940 subscribing 



12 



members, 91 life members. Of these, about 350 share holders, and 
450 subscribing members now pay dues regularly, making our paying 
membership about 800 in all. 

During the past year 16 shares have been sold, and the following 
gentlemen have become life members : 

Warren Loud, F. P. Tracy, Esq., 

Hall McAllister, Esq., James Kellogg, Esq., 

B. W. Leigh, Esq., Frederick Billings, Esq., 

W. B. Olds, Esq., Thomas H. Selby, Esq. 

While we show nominally a decrease of members, as compared with 
the previous year, it is clear from the statistics already given, that our 
active membership has increased. It should, however, be borne in 
mind, that in so changing a population as ours, unless efforts are made 
and continued to bring in new members, a nett loss by change of resi- 
dence and otherwise, is almost inevitable. Let me solicit, then, the 
personal efforts of members, to bring in new members from among 
their friends and others with whom they may come in contact. It 
cannot be doubted that only a moderate amount of labor expended in 
this direction would secure a large increase in our membership. Such 
labor, with such a result, would do a double good. It would increase 
the funds and consequent usefulness of the Association, and it would 
often be of the greatest benefit to the persons, particularly young men, 
thus introduced to its privileges. 

A suggestion was made in the last Annual Report by the retiring 
President, in favor of the establishment of classes from among the 
members of the Association, for instruction in Book Keeping, Drawing, 
Elocution, Ancient and Modern Languages, &c. The government of 
the Association during the past year, have been fully sensible of the 
desirableness of introducing this system of instruction, but they have 
not as yet been able to see their way clear for the initiation of so 
desirable a feature in our Association. I beg, however, to commend 
the subject to the Association and the incoming government, as one 
worthy their attention, and it is hoped their wisdom may devise the 
means of putting some such plan into successful operation. Many 
members of the Association might, by means of it, at small cost, in 
their hours of leisure, do much to supply the deficiencies of only a 
rudimentary early education. 



13 

The Treasurer's account, herewith submitted, shows a balance on 
hand from last year, $ ^ g9 

Amount received during the year from all sources, U,777 87 

$15,038 26 
Disbursements for books, expenses &c, 12,4,4 _ 

/-x u t, a . . . 8 2,563 53 
Cash on hand, •••• ••••••; * ' , nri 

Amount in hands of Wiley & Halstead, New York, 400 u0 

$ 2,96.3 53 

Dues for present quarter, unpaid, about 5Q0 °° 

$ 3,463 53 

Mr. H. H. Moore has continued to fill the position of Librarian to 
the entire satisfaction of the Board of Directors, and it is not doubted 
to the equal satisfaction of the members of the Association. The same 
Assistants who commenced the year with us, viz : John J. Tayker 
and David E. Webb, are still both at their posts, and in my opinion 
are good and faithful servants of the Association. 

The Annual Election, held on the 24th inst., resulted in the choice 
of the following gentlemen as the Government of the Association for 
the ensuing year : 

President, E. H. WASHBURN. 

Vice President, JOSEPH A. DONAHOE. 

Treasurer, JOSEPH M. SHOTWELL. 

Recording Secretary, SAMUEL HUBBARD. 

Corresponding Secretary, B. WATKINS LEIGH. 

Directors : 
A. L. Tubbs, Jacob B. Moore, 

C. H. Raymond, Julius K. Rose, 

Thomas S. Miller, Albert Miller, 

Joseph S. Paxson, R- B- Swain, 

Philip T. Southworth. 

A portion of these gentlemen are members of the old Board, though 
a considerable majority come fresh from the ranks of the Association. 
Both these features are desirable. It is desirable that some of the old 
members of a Board be reelected, because their familiarity with the 
routine of business would for a time be almost indispensable. And it 
is equally desirable that others should go out, because I believe that 
by a system of rotation in office, the Association is constantly increas- 
ing the number of its friends and supporters. I do not see how any 



14 



gentleman can be connected with the government of the Association 
for a year, without ever after feeling a deeper interest in its welfare, 
than he would or could feel otherwise. The gentlemen whom your 
suffrages have called to preside over your affairs for the ensuing year, 
I have no doubt are all eminently worthy of your confidence and sup- 
port, and amply capable of carrying on, with your sympathy and 
cooperation, the work in which you are engaged. That work, in a 
community like this, is a great and beneficent one. Its tendency, 
and its effect, so far as realized, is, if not to excite a love of learning, 
at least to impart a taste for intellectual pursuits, in place of low and 
grovelling amusements, or vices ; to furnish the means by which the 
mind shall be filled with noble and elevating thoughts, instead of those 
that are mean and abject ; and even where there is no special danger 
of the lower and more degrading forms of vice, to raise men above the 
materialism of mere money getting and money hoarding — of merely 
" buying, selling, and getting gain," to a world of far higher and 
nobler thoughts and aspirations. 

In closing my official relations with you, gentlemen, I have the sat- 
isfaction, which I feel in common with my associates, of leaving the 
affairs of the Association in a most prosperous condition. That they 
are so, I claim no merit for myself, but only ask the credit of having 
quietly and conscientiously attended to the duties which you by your 
suffrages imposed upon me a year ago. In the members of the Board 
elected with me, I have ever found efficient coadjutors, and we have 
the satisfaction of separating from each other officially, with the con- 
sciousness that from the first there has existed between us only the 
most perfect harmony and good will. May the incoming Board be as 
fortunate in their relations with each other, and with you, and may 
they be more successful than we have been (for in this we have no 
vanity to be mortified) in guiding the policy, and advancing the inter- 
ests of an institution, even now in its infancy, highly respectable, useful 
and efficient, and in its maturer years I doubt not destined to take 
rank with the best institutions of the kind on the continent — The 
Mercantile Library Association of San Francisco. 

IRA P. RANKIN, 

President. 



15 



Report of the Treasurer of the Mercantile Library Association. 

For the Year ending 2ord January, 1858. 



1857. 
Jan. 23. 



By balance from last year, $3,260 39 

Receipts. 

Assessments collected from members, 8,067 25 

Initiation fees " " " 795 00 

Life memberships " " 730 00 

Shares of stock, 95 00 

Lectures, and Madame Lesdernier's Benefit, 1,926 00 

Library account, received for globe, books lost, &c, 89 50 

Catalogues, sold by the Librarian, 

Insurance premium, returned by J. P. Haven, 



71 87 



$15,038 26 

Disbursements. 

Library account, books, magazines, newspapers &c.,.. $3,460 86 

Expense account, rent, fuel, lights, &c, 3,855 02 

Salaries, Librarian and assistants, 3,489 85 

Furniture account, 409 00 

Insurance on $5,000 143 75 

Printing and advertising, 460 75 

Lecture and Benefit expenses, 580 50 

Printing and stereotyping Catalogue of Novels, 75 00 



—12,474 73 



Balance on hand, . 



$2,563 53 

JOS. M. SHOTWELL, 

Treasurer. 



San Francisco, 23rd January, 1858. 



« •»«» ♦- 



STATEMENT FOR THE YEAR ENDING JANUARY 23, 1858. 

Balance on hand from last year, $ 3,260 39 

Amount received from all sources, 11,777 87 

$15,038 26 
Disbursements for books, expenses, &c, 12,474 73 

Balance on hand, $ 2,563 53 

Dues unpaid for present quarter, about 500 00 

In the hands of Wiley & Halsted, N. Y., for purchase of books, ... 400 00 

$3,463 53 

Statistics. 

Receipts. Disbursements. 

1st year ending January 23, '54, $10,858 50 $10,726 51 

2nd " " " " '55, 13,387 30 11,838 02 

3rd " " " " '56, 9,015 85 8,747 96 

4th " " " " '57, 10,300 00 8,989 27 

5th " " " " '58, 11,777 87 12,474 73 

$55,340 02 $52,776 49 

52,776 49 

$ 2,563 53 



SIXTH 



ANNUAL EEPOET 



OF THE 



OF THE 



Jftaattiik Siltrarg %mi data, 



OF 



SAN FRANCISCO, 



WITH A 



THE TREASURER AND LIBRARIAN'S REPORT, AND 
LIST OF OFFICERS FOR 1859-60. 



r 



. SAN FKAN CISCO: 

CHARLES F. ROBBINS & FREEMAN, PRINTERS, 

CORNER OF CLAY AND BATTERY «TREETB. 

1859. 



LIST OF OFFICERS 



OF THE 



trtaatilt fibrarj &ssimtiai 



FOR 1859-60. 



President : 
J). C. McRUER 



Vice President: 
HENRY CARLTON, Jr. 



Treasurer : 
T. C. BANKS. 



Recording Secretary : 
HENRY C. LEE 



Corresponding Secretary : 
EDAVARD J. PRIX OLE. 



F. A. HOLMAX, 
J. C. STONE,* 
E. J. MUYGRIDGE, 
JOSHUA BARKER, 



Directors : 

J. W. WHITE, 
HENRY II. HAIGHT, 
J. B. SWASEY, 

S. C. BIGELOW, 



JOSEPH IIOBART. 



J^NNJJj^I, REPORT 



OF THE 



TREASURER 



OF THE 



San Jfrannsn Pertaniile f ikarg %mtfatkn. 



Balance on hand January 23d, 1858, $2,563 53 

Receipts. 

Quarterly Dues received from members, $8,062 50 

Initiation Fees, from 184 new members, 920 00 

Life Memberships, from 6 life members, 600 00 

Shares of Stock, for 3 shares sold, 75 00 

Lectures, course for 1858-9, 1,399 00 

Library account, received from F. P. Tracy, Esq., for 

copy of Dugdale's Baronage, 33 00 

From sundry persons for lost books,.. 99 65z= 132 65 

Donation account, received from J. W. Tucker, Esq., 50 00 

Audubon Fund, subscriptions received from sundry persons for 

the purchase of "Audubon's Birds of America," 850 00 

Total Receipts for the year, 12,089 15 

$14,652 68 

Expenditures. 

Library account, — expended for books, magazines, 

periodicals, &c, 2,704 70 

"Audubon's Birds of America,".... 850 00=3,554 70 

Salaries, of Librarian and Assistants, 3,643 70 

Rent of Library Rooms, 2,075 00 

Gas Company's bills for the year, 693 45 

Expense account, — fuel, stationery, and incidental expenses,... 647 57 

Furniture, 205 04 

Insurance account, — premium on $7,500, for one year, 225 63 

Printing and advertising, 255 50 

Lecture expenses, 227 50 

Catalogue account, — for engrossing and binding new manu- 
script catalogue of Library, 176 00. 

Total Expenditures for the year, 11,704 09 

Balance in hands of Treasurer, $2,948 59 

JOS. M. SHOTWELL, 

Treasukkk. 
San Francisco, January 25th, 1859. 



LIBRARIAN'S REPORT. 



Mercantile Library Rooms, 
San Francisco, January 22d, 1859. 

To the Ifemoers of the Mercantile Library Association : 

Ladies and Gentlemen, — I have the honor, for the first time 
during my connection with the Association, in the capacity of Libra- 
rian, to submit to you an Annual Report of its operations and statis- 
tics for the past year. 

The whole number of books drawn from the Library during the 
year, was 17,321, which were classified as follows, viz : — 

Romance, 9,733 vols. Bound Periodicals, 173 vols. 

Travels, 1,822 " Science, 589 " 

Biography, 1,681 « Poetry, 471 " 

History,. 1,125 " Law, 162 " 

Belle Lettres, 809 " Religion, 93 " 

Miscellaneous, 663 " 

While the whole number of books taken out during the year was 

but 207 less than in the preceding one, the number of novels and 

romances drawn was 59 volumes greater ; the number of biographies 

exceeded those taken during the former year, by 132 volumes, and 

the demand for books on the arts and sciences increased 31 volumes. 

The most marked decrease occurs in the departments of history and 

travels; it being in the former, 132, and in the latter, 255 volumes. 

The largest number of volumes drawn in any single month, was 

1,713, in March, and the smallest, 1,286, in September, 1858. 

There have been 1,619 volumes added to the Library during the 

year, classified and arranged into the following departments, making 

the number in each : — 

Romance, 1,760 vols. Science and Art. 748 vols. 

Travels, 861 " Poetry, 555 " 

Biography, 911 « Law and Politics, 575 " 

History, 924 " Religion, 357 " 

Belle Lettres, 725 " Bound Newspapers, 135 " 

Bound Periodicals, 1,036 < ; Miscellaneous, 1,479 " 



which, added to the number reported a year ago, namely, 8,447, 
makes the whole number at the present time, 10,066 volumes. It is 
but just that I should here state that the above round number, by a 
practice (not however an unusual one in reports of the progress of 
public Libraries) of counting duplicates not in use, worn out books, 
and even those that have been lost from time to time, has been con- 
tinued in our annual reports ever since the organization of the Libra- 
ry. I would therefore recommend that some measures be taken this 
year to ascertain, by a careful examination, what books and what 
number of them may fairly and properly be said to constitute the 
Library. Many of the works secured to the Library are of a per- 
manently interesting and highly valuable character, among which 
may be found the following : — 

Audubon's Birds of America, in 5 volumes imperial octavo, and 4 volumes ele- 
phant folio of colored plates. 

The Encyclopedia Britannica, as far as published, 17 volumes, royal quarto, 
bound in half Russia. 

The British Poets, in 96 volumes, 12mo., half morocco binding. 

The British Essayist, in 38 volumes, uniform with the Poets. 

Bohn's Standard Library, 123 volumes, post octavo. 

The British Classics, 28 volumes. 

Bohn's Illustrated Library, 39 volumes. 

The Classical Library, 79 volumes. 

Loudon's Arboretum Brittancicum, 12 volumes, octavo. 

Lavater's Physiognomy, 12 volumes; octavo, illustrated. 

The Autobiography, in 33 volumes. 

Hakluyt's Early Voyages of the English Nation : London, 1589. A folio volume 
in black letter. 

The Voyages of Vancouver, La Perouse ; and the Voyage of La Favorite — all 
fine sets, and complete, with the maps and plates. 

The North American Review, 80 volumes, in half Russia binding. 

Moreris' Dictionnaire Historique, 10 volumes, royal folio, etc., etc. 

About 1,500 volumes were taken from their former places in the 
main Library early in the year, and added to the Library of Reference 
in the end of the Reading Room, adjoining to, and now connected 
with the general Library. In addition to these extra means for af- 
fording facilities to members in making references, the Reading Rooms 
are now regularly furnished, in addition to the magazines and period- 
icals formerly received, with most of those the publication of which 
commenced in the course of the last year ; among which are the 
Atlantic Monthly, Ballou's Magazine, The Great Republic Monthly, 



8 



The Pacific Medical and Surgical Journal, The California Culturist, 
The Hesperian, The California Home Journal, etc., etc. 

In the course of the year, I have prepared a complete alphabetical 
catalogue of the Library, including all the books received up to Oc- 
tober last ; while the additions that have been made since that time, 
have been recorded in a smaller volume kept at the Delivery Desk 
for that purpose. 

In the course of the year, the Association has been presented 
with many valuable donations of Books, Works of Art, Natural Cu- 
riosities and Antiquities, by the following gentlemen, Libraries, etc : 



The Regents of the Smith- 
sonian Institute, 

Wm. H. Stevens, 

Langley & Matthews, 

H. ChanningBeals, 

A. S. Taylor, 

Dr. H. Gibbons, 

E. W. Playter, 

H. La Reintrie, 

S. Hubbard, 

W. W. McCoy, 

Hon. C. L. Scott, 

H. Payot, 

J. S. Hittell, 

P. A. Packard, 

E. J. Muygridge, 

L. P. Fisher, 

Prof. A. D. Bache, 

Hon. J. C. McKibben, 

New Orleans Academy of 
Science, 

Lyceum and Library So- 
ciety of New Orleans, 

C. L. Weller, 

C. McDonald, 

Horace Davis, 

Whitton, Towne & Co., 



F. P. Tracy, 
R. de la Vega, 

G. Patterson, 

The Regents of the State 

of New York, 
The State of Virginia, 
San Francisco Mechanics' 

Institute, 
The Odd Fellows' Library, 
Hon. D. C. Broderick, 
Jacob B. Moore, 
Wm. Wolf, 
R. J. Stevens, 
Hon. Wm. M. Gwin, 
C. E. B. Howe, 
Sidney V. Smith, 
G. L. Johnson, 
Hon. J. R. Bartlett, 
J. C. Derby, 
S. E. Woodworth, 
Joseph Heco, 
The Philadelphia Library 

Company, 
Dr. B. Ober, 
A. J. Moulder, 
The City of Boston, 
J. S. Hall, 



Mrs. M. J. Maltby, 

H. H. Brown, 

Rev. J. A. Benton, 

S. H. Lloyd, 

Joseph Grant, 

G. R. Fardon, 

W. T. Coggeshall, 

Wells, Fargo & Co., 

The Prison Discipline So- 
ciety of Boston, 

Dr. A. B. Stout, 

Dr. V. G. Forgeaud, 

Henry B. Janes, 

J. F. Swift, 

J. B. Charles, 

R. B. Swain, 

A. F. Crittenden, 

H. E. Matthews, 

J. Ross Browne, 

Rev. Jesse T. Peck, 

Capt. Madison, 

Jerry Sullivan, 

Hon. P. A. Roach, 

Capt. McMichael, 

And Publishers of California 
Newspapers and Period- 
icals generally. 



The whole number of members at present belonging to the As- 
sociation is 1,319 ; classified as follows, viz. : Life Members, 97 ; 
Honorary Members, 62 ; Shareholders, 594 ; Subscribing Members, 
566. 

Of the subscribing members, none but those who now pay dues 
are enumerated in the above list ; all the shareholders are included, 



but of the 594 only 271 now pay dues, which, added to 566, the 
number of active subscribing members, makes the whole number of 
paying members at the present time, 837. 

Twenty-one shares of stock have been issued in the course of the 
year, of which eighteen were to life members, who have become so 
during that time, or in former years ; and three shares were sold. 

Nine members have died during the year. 

Six gentlemen have made themselves life members in the course 
of the year, by the payment of one hundred dollars each, viz. : 

Joshua P. Haven, Geo. H. Davis, Jas. C. Cobb, 

Henry Laurencel, J- A. Donahue, Mark Brumagim. 

Respectfully, 

H. H. MOORE, Librarian. 



ANNUAL REPORT. 



Gentlemen of the Mercantile Library Association : 

In conformity with the requirements of the Constitution I sub- 
mit the Sixth Annual Report of the Association, accompanied by 
such comments upon its past, and suggestions as to its future policy 
as I deem best calculated to promote its prosperity. 

The Librarian's and Treasurer's reports, this evening presented, 
disclose a healthy and progressive condition of the affairs of the 
Association, and the operations of the institution during the past 
year, considered in connection with the adverse circumstances to 
which I shall hereafter refer, may justly be deemed highly success- 
ful in their results. 

The elaborate report of your Librarian precluding the necessity 
of further statistics, I shall only refer to such matters of interest 
contained therein as may seem to demand especial consideration. 

MEMBERSHIP. 

It will be perceived, that while our entire membership has been 
increased by the net addition of one hundred and forty-three new 
members, during the year, yet the number of active paying mem- 
bers shows an increase of but thirty-seven — a large falling off 
having occurred in the number of shareholders continuing to pay 
their dues ; this fact, unexplained, would indicate a loss or suspen- 
sion of interest in the affairs of the Association, on the part of 
many of its earliest and heretofore most zealous members, of whom 
this class is chiefly composed, but may, to a great extent, be ac- 
counted for by the large emigration from our midst during the 



11 

year, induced by what is commonly known as the Eraser river ex- 
citement, which drew largely upon the number of our oldest and 
most energetic citizens, many of whom have proved the ardent 
friends and promoters of our enterprise. Our loss of membership 
from this cause was unprecedentedly large during the summer 
months, in view of which, great personal efforts were made by 
some of the members of the Board, to gain additional subscribers, 
the successful results of which appear in the statistics given. 

I would here call attention to the fact, that some three hundred 
shares of stock are now outstanding, on which the dues are not 
paid. I would suggest to the holders of these (to them) useless 
shares, the great benefit that would accrue to the Association, by 
their donating or loaning them to those who would pay the regular 
dues upon them if thus enabled to enjoy the advantages of our 
Library and Rooms. 

BOOKS. 

Sixteen hundred and nineteen volumes have been added to the 
Library during the year, making the entire number now contained 
upon our shelves ten thousand and sixty-six. 

It will be perceived, by reference to the Librarian's report, 
that the Board, while responding liberally to the popular taste for 
works of fiction, and the lighter literature of the day — as indicated 
by the proportionately large number of this class of works with- 
drawn for perusal — has not been neglectful of the more important 
and permanent interests of this department. Of the number of 
volumes added, very many are of a valuable and costly character ; 
some of which are specified by the Librarian, in his report. The 
arrangement with Messrs. Wiley '& Halstead, of New York, au- 
thorizing them to send us, at once, copies of new and popular 
works — of which you were informed in the last Annual Report — 
has been c/mtinued, and in order to obviate, as far as possible, the 
difficulty which must necessarily exist in a membership as large as 
ours, of readily obtaining from the Library newly received works 
of extraordinary interest or popularity, our agents have been fur- 
ther instructed to send additional copies — not exceeding ten of 
any one work — of publications of this character. Surplus copies, 
which will accumulate upon your shelves under this arrangement, 
may be sold or exchanged to advantage when the immediate de- 
mand for them shall have subsided. 



12 



Of the donations to the Association during the past year, the 
following are especially noticeable on account of their value and 
importance : 

From the Commonwealth of Virginia — A set of Statutes at 
Large, State Journals and Documents ; in thirty volumes. 

From the State of Pennsylvania — The Colonial Records and 
Archives of the State ; in twenty-eight volumes. 

From the Regents of the Smithsonian Institution — Volumes of 
their publications. 

From E. J. Muygridge, Esq. — An Illustrated Description of 
the Crvstal Palace, London. 

From Sidney Y. Smith, Esq. — A Physical Atlas of the World. 

From J. W. Tucker, Esq. — A cash donation of fifty dollars. 

To the Hon. D. C. Broderick, Wm. M. Gwin and J. C. McKib- 
ben, the Association is indebted for important governmental docu- 
ments and reports. 

Also, to the Regents of the State of New York, for the last 
Census of the State, and Colonial documents, in ten large quarto 
volumes. 

The aggregate number of Books withdrawn from the Library 
during the year, has been materially affected by the disturbing 
cause to which I have already alluded, as may be ascertained by 
careful examination of the statistics given by the Librarian. Not- 
withstanding the adverse effects of this cause, the number very 
nearly equals that of the preceding year. 

FINANCE . 

The Treasurer's report exhibits a highly satisfactory and flour- 
ishing condition of the financial interest of the Association. The 
regular income of the Association was greatly diminished during 
the second and third quarters of the fiscal year, owing to the tem- 
porary loss of membership, which has been noticed as having oc- 
curred during that period ; yet the entire receipts exceed, with one 
exception, those of any previous year in our history. After all the 
outstanding claims against the Association shall have been paid, a 
cash balance of about $2,500 will remain in the Treasury for the 
use of the incoming Board. 

It will be observed that the amount received from the payment 
of the quarterly dues of members, just about covers the current 
expenses of the Association, leaving us dependent upon extraordi- 



13 

nary resources for the increase and improvement of our Library. 
This fact shows the necessity of an immediate increase of our num- 
ber of active paying members. 

ROOMS. 

A marked increase has been observable during the past year in 
the number frequenting our Reading Room. No effort has been 
wanting on the part of "the Board to sustain and increase its use- 
fulness and attractions. Its files and tables have continued to be 
regularly supplied with the leading foreign and domestic papers, 
and scientific and literary periodicals of the day. A large and 
valuable collection of works of reference has been rendered acces- 
sible to its visitors, and many beautiful works of art adorn its walls. 
This department alone offers great inducements to membership in 
our Association. 

The Chess and Conversation Room has continued throughout 
the year nightly crowded with members— the demand for ad- 
ditional Chess Tables has been supplied to the utmost capacity of 

the room. 

The Lilrary Room having proved entirely inadequate to the 
accommodation of the increased number of volumes, shelving has 
been extended over a portion of the walls of the Reading Room. 
This has been accomplished in such a manner as to meet the present 
necessities of the case, and afford increased advantages to those 
frequenting the room, without seriously marring its appearance. 
Further extension, which will doubtless soon be found necessary, 
will be a subject for the consideration of the incoming Board. 

Section 10 of the Regulations of the Library has been repealed, 
and an order passed by the Board of Directors, allowing of free 
access by members of the Association to the Library Room, a reg- 
ulation which has afforded satisfaction to the members and has not 
resulted in serious inconvenience to the Librarian. The former 
lease of the rooms now occupied by the Association expired in 
December last; in anticipation of that event, the Directors gave 
the subject long and careful consideration, fully sensible of the 
necessity for more extensive accommodations than those afforded 
by our present quarters — the most strenuous efforts were made by 
them to procure other centrally located rooms offering greater 
advantages in this respect ; not succeeding in this, they endeavored 
to renew their lease for the further term of six months only — 



14 

hoping that the new Board might be more successful in the accom- 
plishment of an object so desirable. Finding this impracticable, a 
new lease for the term of one year was effected, at a reduction of $25 
per month on the previous rate, making our present rent $150 per 
month, or $1,800 per annum. The subject of erecting a building 
for the uses of the Association has been fully discussed by the 
Board, and the great beneiits that would accrue to the Institution 
by the accomplishment of this object, were fully recognized. The 
plan of a Joint Stock Building Association, organized under the 
auspices of the Library Association, it was thought, might at some 
future time be found practicable and advisable — but the past year 
was not regarded by the Directors as the most favorable time for 
the commencement of so great an enterprise. 

A proposition relating to this subject has been recently submit- 
ted to the Board, which was favorably regarded by them as seem- 
ing to present an opportunity of meeting all the requirements of 
" the Association in this respect, for several years to come. Their 
term of office having too nearly expired to enable them to act in 
the matter, the whole subject was referred to their successors. I 
commend it to their prompt consideration. 

As many ladies — members of the Association, or using the 
shares of members — frequent our Rooms, I would suggest that, 
under any new arrangement, their convenience be consulted, by 
providing apartments exclusively devoted to their use. 

WORKS OF ART. 

Your collection of works of art has been enriched by the acces- 
sion of a large and valuable painting which has been committed 
to the keeping of the Association by its owner, Col. A. J. Grayson. 
The subject is illustrative of an incident in the adventures of a 
pioneer immigrant family ; the figures are portraits, and the scene- 
ry was painted from nature. It is one of the earliest California 
productions of our eminent artist, W. S. Jewett, Esq., and is an 
object of interest to members and visitors. 

A very valuable old oil painting, said to be an original by 
" Annibale Caracci," has also been deposited with the Association, 
by Col. J. N. Olney, and the very elaborate and beautiful painting 
by " ISTahl," which formerly occupied a place in our Rooms, has 
again been deposited there by its owner, Charles Carl, Esq. 

I would suggest, in accordance with the views expressed in the 



15 

report of a former President, F. A. "Woodworth, Esq., that our 
Rooms present advantages to our citizen artists for the exhibition 
of their productions, by the improvement of which, they might 
contribute to the culture and improvement of the public taste with 
resultant benefit to themselves. 

AUDUBON. 

The great national work, " Audubon's Birds of America," it 
affords me peculiar pleasure to state, has, during the past year, 
become the property of the Association. 

This splendid production of genius, consisting of four hundred 
and thirty-live colored plates, and one thousand and fifty-five life 
size figures of birds, is universally admitted to be the most splendid 
work of the kind ever given to the world, and by the illustrious 
Cuvier, was pronounced "the noblest monument that Art has ever 
raised to Nature." 

The opportunity of securing this, which is believed to be the 
only copy on the Pacific coast, having occurred to my immediate 
predecessor in office, he ardently entered into the plan of raising 
by subscription the sum necessary to its purchase. In this he was 
partially successful, having procured subscribers to the extent of 
nearly one half of the requisite amount. Some of the members of 
the present Board devoted much time and labor to the consumma- 
tion of this project, in which they were eminently successful, the 
entire amount of the purchase price, $850, having been cheerfully 
contributed by the members and friends of the Association. 

CATALOGUE. 

A complete and well arranged Catalogue to a Library, as large, 
gentlemen, as is yours, must be regarded, not so much a great con- 
venience, as an absolute necessity. The preparation of such a 
work is a task of great difficulty, requiring careful accuracy and 
much laborious research. Great diversity of opinion has existed 
among Bibliographers as to the principles which should govern its 
construction ; nor is the question yet definitely settled, but the 
system most generally approved, is that comprising both an alpha- 
betical and an analytical catalogue, the two connected by cross 
references. 

The construction of a catalogue upon this plan has engaged the 
attention of the Board during the past year. A full and complete 



16 



catalogue, alphabetically arranged with reference to the authors 
and subjects of all the books contained in the Library on the first 
of October last, has been prepared by the Librarian, under the su- 
pervision of the Board. This has been fairly transcribed into a 
well bound folio volume of five hundred and forty-four pages, at a 
cost of about $170. The task of preparing the more important 
branch of this work, an analytical catalogue, in which the books 
shall be so classified that it may readily be ascertained what works 
are contained in the library upon any particular subject, by refer- 
ence to that department of knowledge to which they properly be- 
long, it was found necessary to defer to another year. 

I commend the subject to the immediate attention of the new 
Board of Directors. This work completed, would form a complete 
Index to the Library, and would greatly enhance its utility. 

LECTURES. 

Our annual course of Lectures, having heretofore proved so 
eminently successful, both in a pecuniary sense and as interesting 
and instructive intellectual entertainments, your Board during the 
past year felt justified in offering inducements to some one of the 
distinguished lecturers of the Atlantic cities to visit our State and 
lecture before the Association. H. D. Bacon, Esq., a zealous friend 
of library associations, kindly consented to conduct negotiations to 
this effect on our behalf. Replies encouraging as to the future, 
were received from the Hon. Edward Everett, Oliver Wendell 
Holmes, G-. "W. Curtis, and others ; but it was found impracticable 
to effect an arrangement of this kind for the present season. Dis- 
tinguished gentlemen resident among us, to whom the thanks of 
the Association are greatly due, have however, this season, as 
heretofore, generously granted us their services without remuner- 
ation, enabling us to organize a course of Lectures, now in process 
of delivery, presenting an array of talent which would command 
attention and respect in the centres of wealth and civilization. This 
course has been sustained with the usual liberality of our citizens, 
over $1,100 having been realized from the sale of season tickets 
alone. 

ARCHIVES. 

The present Archives of the Association exist only in loose and 
scattered papers, pamphlets and documents. And it is feared that 



IT 



some of them may already have been mislaid or lost. I recommend ' 
that they be immediately collected, arranged and filed or bound, and 
that means be taken for their secure preservation. 

OFFICERS. 

During the year the following changes have occurred in the 
Board of Directors : 

Mr. Jacob Moore, on account of proposed long absence, and Mr. 
A. L. Tubbs, on account of removal from the city, resigned, and the 
vacancies thus occurring, were filled by the election of Messrs. Jacob 
Underbill and G. W. Bell. Unanimity of purpose and harmony of 
action have characterized the deliberations of the Board, and its 
members generally have manifested their solicitude for the welfare of 
the Association by their constant attendance, and their prompt per- 
formance of the duties devolving upon them. 

Mr. H. H. Moore, Librarian, and Messrs. Tayker and Webb, 
Assistants, still occupy the positions in which they have so long and 
so faithfully served the Association. 

The annual election, held on the seventeenth instant, which was 
conducted in a spirited manner, greatly to the pecuniary benefit of 
the Association, resulted in the choice of the following named °-entle- 
men as its officers for the ensuing year : 

President, D. C. McRuer; Vice President, Henry Carlton, Jr. ; 
Treasurer, T. C. Banks ; Recording Secretary, Henry C. Lee ; Cor- 
responding Secretary, Edward J. Pringle ; Directors, F. A. Holman, 
J. C. Stone, E. J. Muygridge, Joshua Barker, J. W. White, Henry 
H. Haight, J. B. Swasey, S. C. Bigelow, Joseph Hobart. Gentle- 
men so long and favorably known to you, will, undoubtedly, justify 
the confidence that you have manifested in their zeal and capacity. 
I ardently desire that they may prove pre-eminently successful in 
advancing the interests of the Association. 

CONCLUSION. 
Gentlemen : In concluding this Report, I would that I could 
command language sufficiently earnest and forcible, not only to incite 
you to renewed and increased efforts in behalf of this, our noble en- 
terprise, but also to command the attention, and enlist the sympathies 
and hearty co-operation, of such of our citizens as have thus far 
2 



18 

disregarded the claims of an institution exerting so great and bene- 
ficial an influence upon the present, and fraught with such incalcula- 
ble results to the future social and moral condition of our city. 

Your great success within the brief period of your existence is 
unparalleled in the history of any similar association in our country. 
Already have you attained a position which would command respect 
in the most favored seats of wealth and intelligence. Your great 
achievements, even had they been accomplished under the most favor- 
able circumstances, might justly have been deemed occasions for 
great satisfaction and laudable pride — wrought amid the adverse cir- 
cumstances that have surrounded you, your Association, organized 
by those who scarcely considered themselves other than adventurers 
in a new field of enterprise, and conducted by you to its present high 
state of usefulness and prosperity, while as yet your business and 
social relations can hardly be considered as established upon a per- 
manent basis, and whilst but few, too few of you, have yet accus- 
tomed yourselves to regard this as your permanent home. They are 
deeply significant of your high appreciation of this and kindred 
institutions. 

If the sentiment contained in an " Address to the Citizens of 
San Francisco," issued by the founders of your institution, that " en- 
terprises of this character are always most prosperous in those commu- 
nities where the standard of intelligence is highest," is true — which 
none will deny — and if it be admitted — which I think is equally 
true — that mere intelligence, unassociated with virtue and morality, 
never originates or sustains purely philanthropic or benevolent enter- 
prises — then may the great and rapid success of your Association 
justly be deemed a fact, entitled to careful consideration by those 
who would rightly estimate the character, as a class, of the merchants 
and business men of San Francisco. Repose not, gentlemen, upon 
your laurels. Let the success which has thus far attended your ef- 
forts, stimulate you to increased exertions. Your membership should 
be largely increased. This might be easily, and must be mainly ac- 
complished, if accomplished at all, by individual effort upon your 
part. Many of you, by still more closely identifying yourselves 
with the interests of the Association, would, while deriving greatly 
increased benefits to yourselves, thereby have suggested to your minds 
measures for the advancement of its interests. 



19 

To such as should be associated with, us in this enterprise, but 
have thus far stood aloof, I would suggest that they may have greatly 
under-estimated the ultimate designs and objects of our Association. 

Whilst the personal benefit of its members was the primary and 
immediate object of our organization, yet it contemplates interests 
and designs apart from and beyond these present results, though the 
formation of a popular circulating library has thus far been the most 
prominent feature of our plans, yet the founders and directors of the 
Association have ever cherished the higher purpose of laying broad 
and deep the foundations of a nobler and more enduring structure. 
To this end, standard authorities, encyclopedias, dictionaries, and 
rare and valuable works, relating to all the departments of human 
knowledge, have been added to our collection, as opportunity has 
offered, and the funds of the Association would permit — and thus 
we hope ultimately to acquire Vast treasures of knowledge, among 
which scholars, men of science, and members of the learned profes- 
sions, may pursue their researches with pleasure and profit to them- 
selves, and with advantage to society. Already have we gathered up 
and preserved all that it has been found possible to obtain, relating 
to the early history of our city and State, much of which, existing 
only in the ephemeral form of loose documents, papers and pam- 
phlets, might otherwise have perished, and yet these may ultimately 
be found possessed of inconceivable value to the future historian, the 
antiquarian, or even the financial interests of our citizens. It has 
been observed that "the most obscure pamphlet, or the flimsiest bal- 
lad, may throw a r.ay of light upon some pregnant fact of history, or 
may serve as the key to a mystery in some life-course which gave to 
an age its very form and pressure." "The causes which render them 
important, are often those that make it difficult to obtain them when 
required." 

Another and a higher consideration of the importance of our As- 
sociation will commend itself to the mind and the heart of every 
patriot, and merits the calm and earnest consideration of all whose 
interests are in any way associated with the future interests of Cali- 
fornia. I mean its resistless agency in molding the characters of such 
numbers of the youth of the present day, who will shortly constitute 
the men of this State. Franklin, the patriot and the philosopher, 
has thus recorded, in reference to the libraries of his day, of which 



20 

he was a zealous promoter : " These libraries have improved the gen- 
V eral conversation of the Americans, ****** said, perhaps, have 
contributed in some degree to the stand so generally made through- 
out the colonies in defence of their privileges." 

Can an institution, which is silently exerting so powerful an influ- 
ence upon the present, and which will tell still more powerfully upon 
the future moral, social and political condition of our city and State, 
be regarded with indifference ( Think of it. 

. Gentlemen, I now resign the trust confided to me, into the hands 
of my successor. May he be able to accomplish all that I have de- 
sired ; and may this, and each succeeding year, prove more prosper- 
ous than the last. May our Institution continue to advance in im- 
portance and extent. Let its- foundations be enlarged, and its super- 
structure rise, until it shall stand revealed a fabric of fair proportions 
and of massive strength, an enduring monument of the enterprise, 
the liberality, and the intelligence of the citizens of San Francisco. 

E. II. WASHBURN, President. 



SEVENTH 



ANNUAL REPORT 



OP THE 



PRESIDENT 



OP THB 



MERCANTILE LIBRARY ASSOCIATION 



OP 



SAN FRANCISCO, 



WITH 



THE TREASURER AND LIBRARIAN'S REPORT, AND 
LIST OF OFFICERS FOR 1860-61. 



SAN FRANCISCO: 

PRINTED BY CHARLES P. ROBBINS, 

111 Clay Street, between Bansome and Battery. 

1860. 






LIST OF OFFICERS 



OF TIIE 



ertantih fiharn %&&fith\iun t 



FOR 1860-61. 



President : 
WM. H. STEVENS. 

Vice President: Treasurer: 

WM. R. GARRISON. J. G. KELLOGG. 

Corresponding Secretary : Recording Secretary . 

R. B. SWAIN. EDW. HUNT. 

Directors : 

CHAS. WOLCOTT BROOKS, JAMES W. J. PIERSON, 
FRANK BAKER, JOHN SHAW, 

D. P. BELKNAP, H. 0. MACY, 

WILLIAM NORRIS, CHARLES R. BOND, 
THOMAS BENNETT. 

Librarian : 
H. H. MOORE. 

Assistants : 
D. E. WEBB, J. I. TAYKER 



A.NNJJ AJL, REPORT 



OF THE 



TREASURER 



OF THE 



an Jfranristo Pertaittile fifoaqr %marim. 



Balance on hand, January 25th, 1859, $ 2,948 59 

Receipts : 

Quarterly Dues received from members, $9,869 00 

Initiation Fees from new members, 1,482 00 

Life Membership from nine life members, 900 00 

Lectures, receipts from regular course and Anderson's 

readings, 513 87 

Books sold, lost, &c, 84 45 

Proceeds Of sale of old Furniture, 151 50 

Course of Lectures by Bayard Taylor, 3,854 00 



Total receipts for the year, 16,854 82 

$19,803 41 
Expenditures : 

Library account, for books, magazines, &c, $3,868 37 

Expense account, rent, gas, fuel, &c, 4,819 31 

Salaries of Librarian and assistants, 4,366 42 

Furniture, 928 00 

Insurance, 384 00 

Expenses of Lectures by Bayard Taylor, 2,049 75 

Furnishing new rooms, 2,629 31 

Total expenditures for the year, 19,045 16 

Balance in hands of the Treasurer, $ 758 25 

THS. CRANE BANKS, 

Treasurer. 
San Francisco, March 10th, 1860. 



LIBRARIAN'S UEPOHT. 



Mercantile Library Rooms, ) 
San Francisco, March 13th, 1860. ) 

To the Members of the 'Mercantile TAbrary Association : 

I have the honor to submit to you the following Report of tin- 
statistics and operations of the Library and Reading Rooms, from the 
date of my last Annual Report, (January 22d, 1859,) to the present 
time. 

The whole number of books drawn from the Library during the year 
was 21,903, which were classified as follows, viz. : — 

Romance, 12,673 vote. Science, 857 vols. 

Travels, 2,099 " Poetry, 655 " 

Biography, 1,857 " Miscellany, 894 " 

History, 1,372- " Bound Periodicals, 198 " 

Belles-Lettres, 1,226 " Religion, 72 " 

The whole number of books taken out in the course of the year was 
4,582 greater than in the preceding one. The larger proportion of the 
increase will be found to have been in the department of Novels and 
Romances ; while the demands from those of History, Travels, Biogra- 
phy, Belles-Lettres, and Science, show in each a considerable increase 
over the number reported last year. The largest number of volumes 
drawn in any single month was 1,784, in August, and the smallest 
1,561, in May, 1859. 

There have been 1,525 volumes added to the Library during the 
year, which were classified, and arranged into the following depart- 
ments, making the numbers in each — 

Romance 2,149 vols. Poetry, 694 " 

Travels, 1,041 " Religion 395 " 

Biography, 1,072 " Law and Politics, 626 " 

History, 1,042 " Reference and Mi8cellan'8,..l, 651 " 

Belles-Lettres, 827 " Bound Newspapers, 144 " 

Arts and Sciences, 902 " Bound Periodicals, 1,048 " 



making in all 11,591 ; from which amount there should be deducted 106 
volumes, donated by the Board of Directors to the City Hospital, last 
May, which would leave the number at present in the Library, 11,485 
volumes. Some of the additions to the Library are valuable and inter- 
esting, and among them are the following works : — 

Audubon's Quadrupeds of North America; three volumes, bound in morocco. 
Silliman's Journal of Science and Art ; a complete set to the present time, in 
72 volumes, bound. 

Contributions to Natural History, by Prof. Agassiz ; 2 volumes 4to. 

Churchill's Collection of Voyages, 6 volumes folio. 

The London Art Journal, 10 volumes 4to. 

Wright's Dictionary, 5 volumes royal 8vo. 

The New American Encyclopedia, 8 volumes. 

The National Encyclopedia, 12 volumes. 

The Encyclopedia Britannica, 18 volumes 4to. 

The English Encyclopedia, 15 volumes 4to. 

Worcester's New Dictionary, 4to. 

Tomlinson's Encyclopedia of Science and Art, 2 volumes. 

Rose's Biographical Dictionary, 12 volumes; etc., etc. 

A considerable increase has been made in the list of magazines and 
newspapers regularly supplied to the Reading Rooms ; among the form- 
er of which may be found, the Historical, Mathematical and Farmer's 
Magazines, The London Athenaeum, Once a "Week, All the Year Round, 
The Cincinnatus, Hovey's Magazine of Horticulture, The Pacific Ex- 
positor, The San Francisco Medical Press, etc. 

In the coarse of the year, I have transcribed the titles of nearly the . 
whole Library, for the purpose of arranging them into an analytical or 
classified catalogue. Whether it shall be completed, and in what form 
it shall be presented to you, remains to be considered and decided by 
your new Board of Directors. 

During the year, the Association has been presented with many val- 
uable donations of books, works of art, and natural curiosities, by the 
following gentlemen, libraries, etc. 

George Clifford, Smithsonian Institution, J. C. Stone, 

Hon. J. B. Weller, The State of California, W. A. Krahe, 

P. C. Dart, Lieut. R. S. Williamson, H. H. Moore, 

J. B. Williams, Samuel Hubbard, J. W. J. Pierson, 

John Roach, G. W. Minns, A. D. Bache, 

C. A. Crane, F. M. Bache, Rev. W. A. Scott, D. D., 

L. R. Lull, Hon. J. C. McKibbin, C. A. Sumner, 

J. A. Banks, Hon. C. L. Scott, J. Partridge, 

American Antiq'n Society, H. La Reintrie, Mer. Lib'y Assoc'n, Baltitn 



6 



E. J. Muygridge, 
J. Hobart, 

G. B. Reed, 
G. Davidson, 
S. Brannan, 

F. W. Macondray, 
W. R. Wadsworth, 
H. Payot, 

M. Ashbury, 

T. S. Parvin, 

W. T. Coggeshall, 

Capt. W. R. Palmer, 

Col. Warren, 

Wm, T. Coleman, 

E. P. Hill, 

H. W. Halleck, 

Hon. S. H. Parker, 

A. J. Moulder, 

M. Frank, 

R. Hawkshurst, 

Rev. Geo. Burrows, D. D. 

G. 0. H. Taaffe, 



Mrs. J. F. Lightner, 

C. Wolcott Brooks, 

Harding & Linekin, 

J. F. Larrabee, 

Hutchings & Rosenfield, 

Sidney V. Smith, 

Capt. Thorn, 

Robert Lindsay, 

J. A. Gilbert, 

B. W. Leigh, 

G. A. Van Bokkelen, 

Rev. J. A. Buckingham, 

Lewis Shearer, 

F. R. Reynolds, 

Regents of State of N. Y. 

H. 0. Howard, 

Gideon Nye, Jr. 

A. F. Alovan, 

Jacob Underbill, 

W. F. Bryant, 

A. J. Grayson, 

Dr. F. A. Holman, 



J. P. Corrigan, 
L. Blanding, 
J. A. Donohue, 
F. Tagliabue, 
W. T. Coleman & Co. 
De Witt, Kittle & Co. 
Sutton & Co. 
Babcock, Cooley & Co. 
Ross, Falconer & Co. 
J. B. Weir, 
Willey & Emanuel, 
J. J. Earle & Co. 
Wells, Fargo & Co. 
J. H. Coghill & Co. 
Crosby & Dibblee, 
J. B. Newton & Co. 
Wellington & Abbott, 
C. C. Hastings, 
Freeman & Co. 
J. T. & W. H. Daly, 
W. H. Davidge, 
W. H. Stevens. 



The whole number of members at present belonging to the Asso- 
ciation is 1,S17 ; classified as follows, viz : Life Members, 106 ; Honor- 
ary Members, 66 ; Share Holders, 612 ; Subscribing Members, 1,033. 
Of the Subscribing Members, only those now paying dues are enumerated 
in the above list; all holders of shares are included, but of the 612, 
only 295 now pay dues, which added to 1,033, the number of active 
subscribing members, makes the whole number of paying members at 
the present time, 1328, showing a net increase since the last Annual 
Report, of 491. 

The following nine gentlemen have made themselves Life Members 
of the Association during the year, by the payment of one hundred 
dollars each, viz : — 



J. S. Hittell, 
D. C. McRuer, 
J. G. Kellogg, 



A. H. Barker, 
J. Bermingham, 
E. W. Leonard, 



J. C. Merrill, 
Erwin Davis, 
A. Humbert. 



Respectfully, 

H. H. MOORE, Librarian. 



PRESIDENT'S ANNUAL REPORT. 



Gentlemen of the Mercantile Library Association. 

I have the pleasure to submit to the members of the Mercantile Li- 
brary Association the Seventh Annual Report, with such comments and 
suggestions as have presented themselves to my mind, touching the in- 
terests of this Institution. 

The Treasurer's report, herewith, exhibits a gratifying increase in the 
revenues of the Association, which have amounted during the past year 
to 816,854,82, being about $4800 in excess of the receipts of any pre- 
vious year. The expenditures of the past year have amounted to $19, 
045,16, of which sum about $3,800 was appropriated for furnishing the 
new rooms — and sundry expenses attendant upon removal. 

Immediately, upon entering upon their official duties, the Board of 
Directors took measures to bring before the Association the subject of 
purchasing a building for its uses ; the matter was referred to a Special 
Committee, who made an elaborate report, presenting a plan of action, 
which was ordered printed, and strenuous efforts were made to induce a 
good attendance of the members of the Association for its consideration ; 
but so little interest was manifested in the project, that we were com- 
pelled to abandon the enterprise for the time, and turn our attention to 
procuring more commodious accommodations under leasehold. The re- 
sult of our endeavors in that respect, was a lease of the rooms we now 
occupy, for the term of three years, with the privilege of renewal for a 
like term, at a monthly rent of $200. 

In this connection I would suggest that we should not lose sight of 
our building project. At the present ratio of increase, I apprehend that, 
at the expiration of the first term of the present lease, the accommoda- 
tions of this building will be inadequate to our requirements; and I 
think the increased revenues of the association will warrant the Board 
of Directors to set aside a small proportion as a Building Fund. A nu- 
cleus once formed, will attract to itself in a few years, under proper 
management, a sum sufficient to justify this Association in contracting a 
debt, if necessary, to provide itself with suitable accommodations. 

There has been expended the past year for books, magazines, &c, 



8 

$3,783 92. The number of books added to the Library by purchase 
and donation, is 1525, many of which are very valuable works. The 
total number of books now in the Library, is 11,485 — number withdrawn 
during the year, 21,903. A donation of 106 volumes, not required by 
the library, was made to the County Hospital during the year. 

In future, there can, no doubt, be a larger sum expended each year, 
than heretofore, for books, and it is of great moment that it should be 
disbursed judiciously. The distribution of this fund is made at present 
by the committee on books, composed of three members of the Board 
of Directors, who often may be in office for only a single year, and can in so 
short a time hardly become acquainted with the wants of the library — 
I would therefore suggest that this interest should be entrusted to a 
special committee, selected by the Board of Directors, from the members 
of the Association, with special reference to their qualifications for this 
important duty ; and that this committee should hold their office during 
the pleasure of the Board. Unless some such plan shall be adopted, I 
fear, that in a few years, our library, numerous in books, may be defic- 
ient in many important departments of literature. 

I would not depreciate the value of that class of literature which appeals 
to the heart, rather than the head. So far as it exercises the affections, 
cultivates the taste, refines and humanizes our natures, it should have a 
large place in our public libraries ; but I beg leave to differ from those 
who think it the duty of associations like this, merely to supply any de- 
mand that the public may make upon it, for reading material. Library 
associations I conceive to be one of the educational institutions of the 
age ; and that it is the duty of those who control them, to endeavor to 
refine and elevate the public taste. 

From the Librarian's report, you will notice that the demand for 
romances during the past year, has been nearly sixty per cent, of the 
whole number of books withdrawn. Should this demand, as indicated, 
govern the selection and purchase of books, by this association, in a 
comparatively short time, we should find ourselves with a very small 
proportion of books in any other department of letters. 

LECTURES. 

Early in the year, correspondence was opened with a number of emi- 
nent gentlemen in the Atlantic States, which resulted in an engagement 
with Bayard Taylor, for a course of lectures. These lectures proved 
very attractive and contributed above $1,800 to our treasury. 

The success attending this enterprise, I trust, will induce other en- 
gagements of similar character. 



The gratification such a course of lectures may give to the community, 
and the pecuniary advantage accruing to our treasury may not be the 
only benefit arising from like engagements. It is of no little moment 
to us, that gentlemen, eminent in the literary firmament, whose words 
are echoed throughout the civilized world, should visit our fair State, 
and proclaim its marvels. 

There have been added during the last year to our membership, 9 
life members and 714 subscribing members. This large increase is 
attributable to a reduction in the initiation fee, from five to two dollars 
— to the attractions of the new rooms — and particularly to the earnest 
efforts of parties interested in the success of candidates for office for 
the ensuing year. 

Of the members at the last Annual Report, there have withdrawn from 
various causes 223, leaving a net increase of 491. The present number 
of subscribing members and stockholders, paying dues, is 132S. If this 
number can be sustained, and, in view of the attractiveness of our rooms 
and their favorable location, I think it probable, it will insure to the 
Association a revenue equal to its current expenses, and leave a large 
surplus at the disposition of its government. 

As this Association is rapidly increasing, and your interests commit- 
ted to the Board of Directors, each year, are of more importance, I think 
it would be advisable to so amend the Constitution, that one-half of the 
Board of Directors should be elected annually, thus securing in the 
Board at all times, a number who are familiar with its position and bus- 
iness. This principle is recognized in the formation of nearly all leg- 
islative bodies, and would, I believe, prove beneficial to the interests of 
this Association. 

I would recommend to the early attention of the Board of Directors, 
the subject of revising the Constitution and By-Laws of this Association. 
So many alterations and amendments have been made, and they exist in 
such fragmentary parts, and the original was so imperfect in some of its 
details, that I deem a revision essentially necessary. There are at pres- 
ent 612 shares of stock outstanding. As I construe the Constitution, 
all shares of stock upon which the dues or assessments remain unpaid 
for six months, become forfeited to the Association — but this rule has 
never been enforced. I commend the subject to the consideration of 
the Directors. 

Of the list of donors submitted by the Librarian in his report, the 
following gentlemen have placed this Association under especial obliga- 
tions to them during the past year : — 

Wm. T. Coleman, Esq., for Audubon's valuable illustrated work. — 
The Quadrupeds of America, in three volumes. Also, for Silliman's 



10 

Journal, in seventy-two volumes, and many_ friendly services, which 
indicate a lively interest in our prosperity. 

F. W. Macondray, Esq., for Agassiz Contributions to Natural History, 
in two volumes. 

Lieutenant R. S. Williamson, for Set of Topographical Maps of the 
Western Coast of United States. 

Messrs. W. T. Coleman & Co., Dewitt, Kittle & Co., Ross, Falconer 
& Co., J. B. Weir, Esq., J. H. Coghill & Co. Crosby & Dibblee, Jno. 
B. Newton & Co., C. C. Hastings, Esq., W. H. Stevens, Esq., Sutton & 
Co., Babcock, Cooley & Co., Wells & Emanuel, John J. Earl & Co., 
Wells, Fargo & Co., Wellington & Abbott, J. T. & W. II. Daly, Free- 
man & Co., W. H. Davidge, Esq., for portraits of Webster and Clay, 
which are in our rooms. 

Pacific Mail Steamship Co., United States Steamship Co., Panama 
Railroad Co., for gratuitous transportation of freight during the year, 
and for free passages granted, at our request, to Bayard Taylor. 

Smithsonian Institute, for two volumes of Smithsonian Contributions 
to knowledge. 

Pioche, Bayerque & Co., for the donation of $150, being the amount 
of one months rent. 

To the Press, generally, for a generous supply of newspapers, our 
thanks are due; and to the Alta, Bulletin and Times, of this City, for 
advertising gratuitously the past year, (which has amounted to a sub- 
stantial benefit,) we are under particular obligations. 

To each and all of the gentlemen, who have bestowed favors upon us 
during the past year, in behalf of the Association, I would express our 
warm appreciation of their kindness, and our most grateful thanks. 

The present eligible location of oiu* rooms, and their attractive char- 
acter, promise large contributions to the prosperity of the Association. 
I beg leave to reccommend that arrangements be made, whereby the 
reading rooms may be supplied with the latest news, upon the arrival 
of Steamers or Overland Mail, as early as any other public resort. We 
live in an age when intelligence travels upon the lightnings' wing, and 
in a community, impatient at such transmission, and it is incumbent 
upon us to conform to the spirit of the age. 

The rooms continue to be supplied with newspapers, from nearly every 
State in the Union, with the leading English and French journals, and 
with all the popular periodicals and magazines of the day. The Chess 
room is furnished with whatever has been deemed necessary to the 
pleasure and comfort of its frequenters. The Library room has been 
arranged with reference to a better accommodation for ladies than here- 
tofore, and it is hoped that they will find it an agreeable resort. 



11 

The property of the Association, has appreciated so much since the 
last report, that the Directors considered it advisable to effect insurance 
upon it for $20,000, which risk has been taken by four insurance offices, 
in sums of $5,000. 

There have been added to the works of Art, since the last Annual 
Report, a painting representing the "Landing of Columbus," which was 
purchased by the Association, and is pronounced by connoiseurs, a work 
of considerable merit. Portraits of Webster and Clay, contributed by 
merchants of New York, before mentioned. Nine busts of Ancient 
Philosophers and Modern Statesmen, presented by C. W. Brooks, Esq., 
and a bust of "Washington, carved from Benicia stone by A. Pattenghi, 
Esq., and presented by the artist. 

The following changes have taken place during the year, in the Board 
of Directors: — 

Mr. Carlton, Vice President, resigned on account of proposed absence, 
and Mr. H. H. Haight, was elected to the vacancy. Mr. Lee, Recording 
Secretary, was compelled to resign by reason of ill health, and Mr. 
Joshua Barker, was elected to the vacancy. Messrs. Stone, Swasey and 
Hobert, resigned on account of proposed absence. The several vacan- 
cies occasioned by the resignations and elections noted above, were 
filled by the election of Messrs. Jacob Underbill, B. F. Voorhees, W. 
H. Stevens, Joseph Eastland and J. F. Lightner, as members of the 
Board of Directors. 

The annual election for officers for the ensuing year, (postponed by 
order of the Association, until the occupation of the new rooms,) was held 
on Tuesday, March 6th. A spirit of generous rivalry stimulated the 
friends of the various candidates, which resulted in a large accession to 
our list of members, and contributed liberally to our treasury. 

The Mantle of office fell upon the following named gentlemen : — 

President, W. H. STEVENS. 

Vice President W. K. GARRISON. 

Corresponding Secretary, R. B. SWAIN. 

Recording Secretary, EDWARD HUNT. 

Treasurer, J. G. KELLOGG. 

Directors: — Charles Wolcott Brooks, Frank Baker, D. P. Belknap, William Nor- 
ris, J. W. J. Pierson, John Shaw, H. C. Macy, C. R. Bond, Thomas Bennett. 

I beg leave in laying down the insignia of office, to congratulate this 
Association upon its present position and future prospects. The ques- 
tion of its success is resolved. It now only remains to use wisely the 
means at our command, to develop an institution, which shall be to this 
coast, an ornament and a pride. As indicative of the progress of social 
order in our midst, the prosperity which has attended this Associatioa, 



12 



hiUst be, to every well wisher of this community, a constant source of 
felicitation. 

I now resign to my successor, the charge entrusted to my care. I 
take leave of my associates in office with great regret. To me, the 
frequent meetings in our official relations, have been agreeable and 
pleasant reunions, and I take pleasure in testifying to the zeal and inter- 
est manifested by the late Board of Directors, in the management of 
the affairs of this Association ; and I know that whatever of care or 
labor has been bestowed by them to the advancement of its interests, is 
amply requited in view of the gratifying prosperity that attends this 
institution, upon their retirement from office. 



D. C. McRUER, President. 



San Francisco, March 13. I860. 



13 

TABULAR STATISTICS 

Shoiving the progress of the Mercantile Library Association, from its 
organization in January, 1853, to March, 1860. 

FINANCES. 

1853. Receipts $10,858 50 Expenditures $10,726 51 

1854. do 13,3S7 30 do 11,838 02 

1855. do 9,015 85 do. 8,747 96 

1856. do 10,300 00 do. 8,989 27 

1857. do 11,777 S7 do 12,474 73 

1858. do 12,089 15 do 11,704 09 

1859. do 16,854 82 do. 19,045 16 

GROWTH OF THE LIBRARY. 

1853. Number of Volumes at the commencement of the year, . . 1,500 
1S54. do. do. do. do. do. .. 2,705 

1855. do. do. do. do. do. .. 3,315 

1856. do. do. do. do. do. .. 3,833 

1857. do. do. do. do. do. .. 6,135 
185S. do. do. do. do. do. . . 8,447 
1S59. do. do. do. do. do. ..10,066 

1860. do. do. do. do. do. ..11,485 

INCREASE OF MEMBERS. 

1854. Number of Members at the commencement of the year, . 392 

1855. do. do. do. do. do 552 

1856. do. do. do. do. do 550 

1857. do. do. do. do. do 1250 

1858. do. do. do. do. do 1176 

1859. do. do. do. do. do 1319 

1860. do. do. do. do. do 1817 

OPERATIONS OF THE LIBRARY. 

1S54. Number of Volumes taken out, 3,371 

1855. do. do. do 8,367 

1856. do. do. do 10,466 

1857. do. do. do 17,528 

1858. do. do. do 17,321 

1859. do. do. do 21,903 

The terms of Membership in the Association, are, for a Subscribing 
Member, an initiation fee of $2, and quarterly dues of $3, payable in 
advance. Shares of $25 subject to the same assessments as Subscribing 
Memberships. Life Memberships, $100, without further assessments, 
Life Members are also entitled to have two shares of stock issued to 
them without charge. 



14 



NEWSPAPERS OF CALIFORNIA AND THE PACIFIC 
COAST, IN THE READING ROOMS, 1860. 



SAN FRANCISCO. 

Alta California, 
Herald, 
Daily Times, 
Morning Call, 
Evening Bulletin, 

do Telegram, 

do Gazette, 
Golden Era, 

Mercantile Gazette and Prices Current, 
California Farmer, 
The Pacific, 

California Christian Advocate, 
The Pacific Methodist, 
The Monitor, 
Spirit of the Times, 
California Home Journal, 
Weekly Gleaner, 
The Pledge, 
Le Phare, 

L'Echo du Pacifique, 
L'Eco della Patria, 
Le Mineur, 
Police Gazette. 

SACRAMENMO. 

Daily Union, 
Morning Star, 
Evening Post. 

STOCKTON. 

Daily Argus, 

"Weekly Democrat, 

San Joaquin Republican. 

MARTSVILLE. 

California Express, 
National Democrat, 
The Leader. 



MISCELLANEOUS. 

The Republican, Shasta, and Courier, do Polynesian, 



Trinity Journal, Weaverville, 
The Beacon, Red Bluff, 
Sierra Democrat, Downieville, 
Sierra Citizen, do 

Mountain Messenger, La Porte, 
Weekly Patriot, Iowa Hill, 
The Butte Record, Oroville, 
Plumas Standard, Quincy, 
Hydraulic Press, North San Juan, 
Placer Courier, Yankee Jims, 
Nevada Journal, Nevada, 
Nevada National, Grass Valley, 
Tuolumne Courier, Columbia, 
The Times, Coloma, 
Placer Times, Auburn, 
Union Democrat, Sonora, 
Democratic Age, do 
The Star, Mariposa, 
The Democrat, Hornitas, 
Folsom and Placerville Express, 
Independent, San Andreas, 
Napa County Reporter, Napa, 
Sonoma County Journal, Petaluma, 
Contra Costa Gazette, Martinez. 
Alameda Gazette, 
San Jose Telegraph, do Reporter, 
Santa Cruz News, 
San Diego Herald, 
Southern Vineyard, Los Angelos, 
The Star, do 

Territorial Enterprise, Carson City, 
Weekly Times, Portland, Standard, 
Herald, Crescent City, 
The Statesman, Salem, 
Herald, Steilacoom, 
Victoria Gazette, and Colonist, 
Commercial Advertiser, 



do 



Honolulu, 
do 



-•♦o» 



ATLANTIC AND EUROPEAN NEWSPAPERS RECEIVED 
IN THE READING- ROOMS, 1860. 



EASTERN. 

Portland Transcript, 

The Democrat, Bangor, Maine, 

Bangor Daily Union, 

Independent Democrat, Concord, 

Bunker Hill Aurora, Charlestown, Mass., 

Rhode Island Country Journal, Prov., 

Boston Journal, 

Boston Traveller, 

Ballou's Pictorial, 

Flag of our Union. 



NEW YORK. 

Courier and Enquirer, 
Journal of Commerce, 
Spectator, 
Weekly Tribune, 

" Times, 

« Herald, 
Harper's Weekly, 
The Century, 

Frank Leslie's Illustrated Newspaper, 
Spirit of the Times, 



15 



Porter's Spirit, 

The Ledger, 

Home Journal, 

The Albion, 

Yankee Notions, 

Irish News, 

Scientific American, 

Conrier des Etas Unis, 

La Cronica, 

New Yorker Democrat, 

New Yorker Wocherblatt, 

Stock Journal, 

Working Farmer, 

Country Gentleman. 

SOUTHERN. 

Weekly Southern Argus, Norfolk, Va,, 
Weekly Clipper, Baltimore, 
National Intelligencer, Washington, 
National Era, do 

Union, do 

Weekly Constitution, do 

Forney's Press, Philadelphia, 
Dollar Newspaper, do 



Mobile Weekly Advertiser, 
True Delta, New Orleans, 
Picayune, do 

WESTERN. 

Missouri Republican, 

Louisville Journal, 

Weekly Scientific Artizan, Cincinnati, 

Cincinnati Dollar Commercial, 

Wool Grower, Cleveland, 

Chicago Weekly Journal, 

Buffalo Commercial Advertiser, 

Buffalo Patriot and Journal. 

BRITISH AND OTHER FOREIGN PAPERS. 

The Evening Mail, London, 

Weekly Dispatch, do 

Bell's Life in London, 

Illustrated London News, 

Illustrated News of the World, 

London Punch, 

Wilmer & Smith's European Times, 

The Nation, Dublin, 

Le Monde Illustree, Paris. 



MAGAZINES RECEIVED IN THE READING ROOMS, 1860. 



CALIFORNIAN. 

Hutchings' Magazine, 

The Hesperian, 

California Culturist, 

Pacific Medical and Surgical Journal, 

San Francisco Medical Press, 

The Pacific Expositor. 

ENGLISH REPRINTS AND SELECTIONS. 

All the Year Round, 

Art Journal, 

Bentley's Miscellany, 

Blackwood's Magazine, 

British and Foreign Medical and Chi- 

rurgical Review, 
Chambers' Journal, 
Colburn's United Service Magazine, 
Dublin University Magazine, 
Edinburgh Review, 
Eclectic Magazine, 
Littell's Living Age, 
London Athenaeum # 
London Quarterly Review, 
North British Review, 
Notes and Queries, 
Once a Week, 
Tait's Edinburgh Magazine. 
Westminster Review. 



MISCELLANEOUS. 

American Journal of Science and Art, 

American Farmers' Magazine, 

Atlantic Monthly, 

Banker's Magazine, 

Bronson's Quarterly Review, 

Chess Monthly, 

Cincinnatus, 

Cosmopolitan Art Journal, 

De Bow's Review, 

Farmers' Magazine, 

Harper's Magazine, 

Historical Magazine, 

Horticulturalist, 

Hovey's Magazine of Horticulture, 

Hunt's Merchant's Magazine, 

Journal of the Franklin Institute, 

Journal of Medical Science, 

Knickerbocker Magazine, 

Ladies' Home Magazine, 

Mathematical Monthly, 

Medical News and Library, 

Mining Magazine, 

Missionary Herald, 

North American Review, 

New Englander, 

Southern Literary Messenger, 

Young Mens' Magazine. 



16 
REGULATIONS OF THE READING ROOM. 



Section 1. The Reading Room shall be open every day through- 
out the year, from 8 o'clock, a. m., to 11 o'clock, p. m. 

Sec. 2. Loud conversation and smoking shall not be allowed, except 
in the room set apart for those purposes, 

Sec. 3. No member will be allowed to remain in the Library or 
Reading Room with his hat on. 

Sec. 4. No member shall assume the liberty of arranging the books 
of the Library, or periodicals on the tables, or of performing any of the 
duties that devolve upon the Librarian. 

Sec. 5. None but members shall be allowed the privilege of the 
Reading Room, unless introduced by a member of the Association. 

Sec. 6. Any member may have the privilege of introducing a friend 
not a resident of the city, whose name shall be registered by the Libra- 
rian in a book kept for that purpose, and who shall receive a ticket of 
admission to the Reading Room for the term of four weeks. 

Sec. 7. No member shall be allowed the privilege of the Reading 
Room, unless all dues and forfeitures incurred are liquidated. 

Sec. 8. No member shall be allowed to remove papers from the files, 
or books, plates, or periodicals from the Reading Room. 

Sec. 9. Any member who shall mutilate the periodicals or papers 
placed on the files or tables in the Reading Room, or remove them there- 
from, shall be liable to fine and expulsion. 

Sec. 10. Should a member transgress any article in these Regula- 
tions, he shall be reported to the Board of Directors, who may take such 
measures thereon as they may deem expedient. 

Sec. 11. The Regulations of the Library and Reading Room shall 
not be altered, amended, or suspended, unless by the votes of six mem- 
bers of the Board of Directors, present at a stated meeting, notice being 
given for that purpose. 



REGULATIONS OF THE LIBRARY. 



The Library shall be open every day throughout the year, from 9 
o'clock, A. M., to 10 o'clock, P. M., excepting Sundays, the Fourth of 
July, Thanksgiving Day, Christmas and New Year. 

A member may receive, applying personally, or by his written 
order, one volume, if it be a folio or quarto ; and two, if an octavo, or 
duodecimo, or volume of less size. 



17 

Every member may detain each book or set delivered as aforesaid, if 
it be a folio or quarto, four weeks ; an octavo, tliree weeks ; or a book or 
set of less size, two weeks; except new publications, which, until they 
have been in the Library two months, shall not be detained — an octavo 
longer than two weeks, and books of less size one week, and which shall 
not be renewed. No book shall be reserved by the Librarian for any 
director or member. 

Any member who shall detain a book or set longer than the time 
above limited, respectively, shall forfeit and pay to the Librarian for 
every day a volume is so detained, if it be a folio, twenty cents; a 
quarto, fifteen cents ; an octavo, ten cents ; if it be a duodecimo, or smaller 
volume or pamphlet, five cents. 

If any member lose or injure a book, he shall make the same good to 
the Librarian; and if the book lost or injured be one of a set, he shall 
pay to the Librarian, for the use of the Association, the full value of said 
set, and may thereupon receive the remaining volumes as his property. 

No member shall be permitted to receive a book from the Library 
until he shall have paid all sums due from him to the Association, and 
made good all damages and losses which he may have occasioned. 

Books of Reference, and such others as may from time to time be 
specially designated by the Board, shall not be taken from the Library, 
except by special permission of a member of the Board of Directors ; 
provided, however, that Newspapers, Encyclopaedias, Cyclopaedias, Dic- 
tionaries and Atlasses, shall in no case be taken from the Library Rooms. 

Any member wishing to withdraw from the Association, must inform 
the Librarian of it, see that his resignation is registered, and pay up his 
dues and fees, else he will be considered as continuing a member, and 
charged accordingly, unless otherwise ordered by the Board of Directors. 



18 

OFFICERS, PAST AND PRESENT. 



OFFICERS FOR 1853-4. 



President, D. S. Turner. 

Vice President, J. P. Haven. 

Recording Secretary, W. H. Stevens. 

Corresponding Secretary,. .Dr. H. Gibbons. 

Treasurer, 0. E. Bowers, Jr. 

Directors— E. E. Dunbar, J. B. Crockett, E. P. Flint, D. H. Haskell. 

Librarian, "W. D. Bickman. 

Assistant, J. J. Tayker. 



OFFICERS FOR 1854-5. 



President, D. S. Turner. 

Vice President H. Ohanning Beals. 

Recording Secretary, W. H. Stevens. 

Corresponding Secretary, . .F. A. Woochvorth. 

Treasurer, C. L. Strong. 

Directors— W. R. Wadsworth, P. A. Roach, J. H. Purkitt, E. P. Flint, 
F. S. Hawley, W. MacMichael, D. Olyphant Vail, A. G. Randall, 
J. H. Gardiner. 

Librarian, Horace Davis. 

Assistant, J. J. Tayker. 






OFFICERS FOR 1S55-6. 



President, Henry M. Hale. 

Vice President, W. H. Stevens. 

Recording Secretary, J. H. Gardiner. 

Corresponding Secretary, . . F. A. TVoodwortli. 

Treasurer, Spear Riddell. 

Directors — J. H. Purkitt, Ira P. Rankin, A. W. McKee, J. B. Newton, 
R. D. W. Davis, R. E. Brewster, W. A. Macondray, J. M. Cough- 
lin, "W. R. Wadswortb. 

Librarian, E. De Sola. 

Assistant, J. J. Tayker. 






19 

OFFICERS FOR 1856-?. 



President F. A. Woodworth. 

Vice President, E. H. Washburn. 

Recording Secretary, W. 0. Hyde. 

Corresponding Secretary,. -E. H. Howard. 

Treasurer, W. R. Garrison. 

Directors — J. G. Kittle, J. H. Coghill, H. D. Oliphant, C. J. Dempster, 
H. D. Walbridge, T. J. L. Smiley, W. J. Bailey, J. A. Donahoe, 
G. H. Kellogg. 

Librarian, H. H. Moore. 

Assistant, J. J. Tayker. 



OFFICERS FOR 1857-8. 



President, Ira P. Rankin. 

Vice President, Andrew W. McKee. 

Recording Secretary, H. D. Olipliant. 

Corresponding Secretary, . . J. M. Sliotwell. 

Treasurer, Jules David. 

Directors — P. Verplank, Jr., C. H. Raymond, M.J.Burke, Samuel 
Hubbard, T. J. Lamb, George Howes, Wm. Arrington, Benjamin 
Haynes, W. F. Parker. 

Librarian, H. H. Moore. 

Assistants, < ' 

i J. J. Tayker. 



OFFICERS FOR 1858-9. 



President, E. H. Washburn. 

Vice President, Joseph A. Donahoe. 

Recording Secretary, Samuel Hubbard. 

Corresponding Secretary,. .B. Watkins Leigh. 

Treasurer, Joseph M. Sliotwell. 

Directors — A. L. Tubbs, 0. H. Raymond, Thomas S. Miller, Joseph S. 
Paxson, Julius K. Rose, Albert Miller, R. B. Swain, P. T. South- 
worth. Jacob B. Moore. 

Librarian, H. H. Moore. 

Assistants, { ' 

t „ J. J. Tayker. 



20 

OFFICERS FOR 1859-60. 



President, D. C. McRuer. 

Vice President, Henry Carlton, Jr. 

Recording Secretary, Henry 0. Lee. 

Corresponding Secretary, ...Edward J. Pringle. 

Treasurer, T. C. Banks. 

Directors — F. A. Holman, J. C. Stone, E. J. Muygridge, Joshua Bar- 
ker, J. W. White, Henry H. Haight, J. B. Swasey, S. C. Bigelow, 
Joseph Hohart. 

Librarian, H. H. Moore. 



. .. . i D. E.Webb, 

Assistants, < 

I J. J. Tavker. 







EIGHTH 



ANNUAL REPORT 



OF THE 



:e*x£esij3eivt 



OF THE 



ercantih fikarg ^ssoriatum 



£$£, 



OF 



S-A.3ST Fi^-A.isrGisao 3 



WITH 



THE TREASURER AND LIBRARIAN'S REPORT, 
AND. LIST OF OFFICERS FOR 1861-62. 



SAN FRANCISCO : 

A.QNEW * DEFFEBACH, PRINTERS, 125 3ANSOME STREET. 
186 1. 



LIST OF OFFICERS 



OF THE 



MERCANTILE LIBRARY ASSOCIATION, 



For 1861-62. 



President JAMES W. WHITE. 

Vice-President THOS. J. LAMB. 

Treasurer BENJ. SMITH. 

Recording Secretary E. H. JACQUELIN. 

Corresponding Secretary WALTER MARTINEAU. 

DIRECTORS. 

MAJ. H. LEONARD, A. L. EDWARDS, 



JOHN S. DAVIES, J. P. NOURSE, 

R. C. ROGERS, J. LAWRENCE POOL, 

J. M. STROBRIDGE, J. C. JOHNSON, 

J. M. McNULTY, M. D. 

Librarian H. H. MOORE. 

Assistants D. E. WEBB and J. J. TAYKER. 






ANNUAL REPORT 



OP THE 



TEEASIJEER 



OF THE 



San Francisco Mercantile Library Association, 



-♦♦♦- 



Balance on hand, March 15th, 1860 $758 25 

RECEIPTS. 

Quarterly Dues received from Members $12,223 50 

Initiation Fees from new Members 654 00 

Life Membership from three Life Members 300 00 

Lectures— receipts from regular course 951 00 

Books sold, lost, etc 92 50 

Course of Lectures by Thos. Starr King 2,383 50 

Total receipts for the year 16, 604 50 

$17,362 75 
EXPENDITURES. 

Library account, for books, magazines, etc $4,969 35 

Expense account, rent, gas, fuel, etc 5 >1 C9 12 

Salaries of Librarian and Assistants 3,754 31 

Furniture 48 00 

Printing 242 50 

Catalogue 250 00 

Expenses of Lectures by Thos. Starr King, and regular course 1,575 75 

Furnishing new rooms ^^ " 

Total expenditures for the year 16,482 20 

Balance in hands of the Treasurer $880 55 

J. G. KELLOGG, 

Treasurer. 
San Francisco, Jan. 28th, 1861. 

Nora—There remains some $2,000 of debts owing by the Library at date of Treasurer's Report. 



LIBRARIAN'S ANNUAL REPORT. 



Mercantile Library Rooms, ) 
San Francisco, Jan. 28, 1861. \ 

To the Members of the Mercantile Library Association : 

I have the honor of submitting to you the following Report 
of the statistics and operations of the Library and Reading 
Rooms, from the date of my last Annual Report, (March 13th, 
I860,) to the present time. 

The whole number of books borrowed from the Library during 
the year was 25,757, which were classified as follows, viz : 

Romauce 16,292 vols. Science and Art 1,067 vols. 

Travels 1,695 " Poetry 573 " 

Biography 2,211 " Miscellany 1,148 " 

History 1,231 " Bound Periodicals 173 " 

Belles-Lettres 1,195 " Religion 172 « 

The whole number of books taken out in the course of the 
year was 3,854 greater than in the preceding one. Nearly the 
whole increase appears to have been in the department of Novels 
and Romances, and the remainder was about equally divided be- 
tween those of Science and Art, and Biography. The largest 
number of volumes drawn in any single month was 2,826, in 
March, and the smallest 2,436, in November, 1860. 

There have been 2,336 volumes added to the Library during 
the year, which were classified and arranged into the following- 
departments, making the numbers in each — 

Romance 2,664 vols. Poetry 867 vols 

Travels 1,244 " Religion 435 " 

Biography 1,282 " Law and Politics 727 " 

History 1,297 " Reference and Miscellaneous 1,741 " 

Belles-Lettres 974 " Bound Newspapers 154 " 

Arts and Sciences 1,280 " Bound Periodicals 1,262 " 



s. 






which, (2,336 volumes,) added to the number reported last year, 
namely 11,485, would make the entire number of, at present, 
composing the Library, 13,821 volumes ; but if the books which 
have been lost and worn out, during eight years, and those of 
the duplicates which are of no use to the members, were not 
counted, its whole number for practical purposes would not much 
exceed 13,000 volumes. It will be seen that, while considerable 
additions have been made to each of. the departments, those of 
the Arts ancl Sciences, and the bound Periodicals, have received, 
each, an unusual number of addition. Among some of the most 
valuable of the accessions, both by donation and purchase, may 
be named the following works : 

Lord Kingsborough's Antiquities of Mexico and Dupaix Monuments of New- 
Spain ; 9 volumes imperial folio. (Presented by Eugene Casserly, Esq.) 

Two Portfolios, containing 120 of the large Photographic Views in Rome ; by 
Macpherson. (Presented by Henry M. Naglee, Esq.) 

A Folio Volume of Photographic copies of Documents, etc., submitted upon the 
trial of the Limantour Case. (Presented by J. B. Williams, Esq.) 

Blackwood's Magazine, 81 volumes. 
The Quarterly Review, 108 volumes. 
Southern Literary Messenger, 25 volumes. 
Biographie Nouvelle des Contemporains, 25 volumes. 
Schoolcraft's Indian Tribes of the United States, 5 volumes royal quarto. 
Benton's Abridgment of the Debates in Congress, 14 volumes. 
The Supplementary Volumes of the United States Exploring Expedition ; by 
Dana, Gould & Hale ; with folio volumes of Colored Plates. 

Journal des Mines, 19 volumes. 

Tevnaux-Compan's Collection des Voyages a l'Amerique, 20 volumes. 

Lardner's Cabinet Cyclopedia, 130 volumes. 

Cassin's Birds of America, 2 volumes quarto. 

Shaw's Dresses and Decorations of the Middle Ages, 2 volumes ; etc., etc. 

Many additions have been made to the Magazines and News- 
papers, taken for use in the Reading Rooms, among which are : 
The Artizan, The Builder, Fraser's Magazines, The United Ser- 
vice, Dublin University, Civil Engineer, Mechanics, Philosoph- 
ical and Cornhill Magazines, Annals of Natural History, Hall's 
Journal of Health, Revue des Deux Mondes, etc., etc.; and of 
Newspapers, The Century, Vanity Fair, The Engineer, Mining- 
Journals, (English and American,) The Spectator, Gardner's 
Chronicle, Railway Times, Examiner, etc. 



6 



The Catalogue, alluded to in my last report, has been printed, 
and will be ready in a few days. 

During the year, the Association has been presented with 
many valuable donations of books, works of art, and natural 
curiosities, by the following gentlemen, libraries, etc.: 



Capt. H. W. Halleck, 

M. Frank, 

Rev. Dr. Burrows, 

C. Wolcott Brooks, 

Sidney V. Smith, 

Prof. A. D. Bache, 

T. J. L. Smiley, 

J. Ross Browne, 

Capt. T. B. Cunningham, 

Hon. Archibald Campbell, 

G. Davidson, 

Boston Public Library, 

Horace Davis, 

Smithsonian Institution, 

A. Roman, 

J. Ferguson, 

J. B. Williams, 

Dr. J. B. Trask, 

E. R. Campbell, 

C. R. Bond. 



S. H. Parker, 
J. Roach, 
G. OH. Taaffe. 
Harding & Linekin, 
W. II. Shoek, 
Hon. C. L. Scott, 
Capt. G. Thorn, 
A. S.. Taylor, 
J. Archbald, 

D. C. Stone, 
R. II. Brown, 

Swan, Brewer & Tileston, 
H. Wilkes, 
H. D. Dunn. 
J. S. Horaans, 

E. Conway, 
Lucian Skinner, 
Mrs. J. P. Haven, 
H. M. Naglee, 



A. J. Moulder, 
R. Hawkshurst, 
Mrs. J. F. Lightucr, 
J. de f remery, 
S. W. Tatem, 
E. J. Muygridge, 
C. A. Ely, 
II. G. Langley, 
Hon. M. S. Latham, 
Monroe Ashbury, 
A. Humbert, 
H. La Reintrie, 
G. H. Bell, 
C. A. Scammon, 
J. W. Forney, 
J. W. Osborne, 
J. S. Davies, 
W. R. Wood, 
Eugeue Casserly, 



The whole number of members at present belonging to the 
Association is 1,694 — classified as follows, viz : Life Members, 
109 ; Honorary Members, 67 ; Shareholders, 618 ; Subscribing 
Members, 900. Of the Subscribing Members, only those now 
paying dues are enumerated in the list ; all holders of shares are 
included, but of the 618, only 257 now pay dues, which, added 
to 900, the number of paying subscribing members, makes the 
whole number now contributing to the Association, 1,157. 

The following three gentlemen have made themselves Life 

Members of the Association during the year, by the payment of 

one hundred dollars each, viz : Louis A. Garnett, Lloyd Tevis, 

and Lewis Pierce. 

Respectfully, 

H. H. MOORE, 

Librarian. 















PRESIDENT'S ANNUAL EEPOET. 



» < « 



Gentlemen of the Mercantile Library Association : 

In compliance with the provisions of the Constitution, I 
have the pleasure of submitting to you the Eighth Annual Re- 
port of the Association, with such suggestions as may seem 
" calculated to promote its prosperity." 

FINANCES. 

The Report of the Treasurer, embracing a period of about ten 

months, viz : from March 15th, 1860, to January 26th, 1861, 

shows as follows : 

Total Receipts $16,513 50 

Add balance on hand, March 15th, 1860 758 25 

Total $17,271 75 

Expenditures 16,470 20 

Balance in Treasury, January 2Gth, 1861 $801 55 

I subjoin a comparative statement of the Receipts and Expen- 
ditures during such period of ten months and the preceding pe- 
riod of fourteen months, with a brief review of the several items. 

RECEIPTS. 

Quarterly Dues from Members. — In this important item, there 
is the large increase of $2,308 50. 

Initiation fees from Members. — Here appears a decrease of $838. 

Life Membership. — A decrease also of $600, having added only 
three Life Members. 

Books Sold, Lost, fyc. — Increase of some few dollars. 

EXPENDITURES. 

Library Account for Books, Magazines, fyc. — This exhibits an 
increase of $1,100 98. But it will be borne in mind that unusu- 



8 

ally large and more valuable additions have been made to our 
Library during the period named, namely ten months, than du- 
ring the whole of any other year. 

Expense Account, Rent, Gas, Fuel, fyc. — An increase of $337 81. 

Expense of Lectures. — Here we observe a decrease of $474. 
Neither the receipts nor expenditures in this item were so large 
as last year. 

Salaries of Librarian and Assistants. — The amount is less by 
$612 11, than appears in the last Annual Report. 

Furniture and Furnishing New Rooms. — These items, taken 
together, show a decrease of $3,036 14. But it is only requisite 
to state, in explanation of this apparently great difference, that 
unusually large disbursements were rendered necessary last year 
by the removal to and occupation of our new Rooms. 

Catalogue Account. — The sum thus far expended is about 
$250. The entire cost of the new Catalogue will reach $650, 
or thereabouts. 

LIBRARY. 

From the full and able Report of the Librarian, we learn that 
the whole amount of Books drawn from the Library during the 
year is 25,757 — being greater by 3,854 than the number drawn 
out during the preceding year, or rather, speaking with more 
exactness, during the preceding term of fourteen months. 

There have been, during the year, 2,336 volumes added to the 
Library, which now contains about 13,821 volumes. Among 
these new acquisitions are many works of great value in Science, 
Arts, History, Geography, Antiquity, etc. 

MEMBERS. 

The Members now belonging to the Association are stated to 
be as follows : Life Members, 108; Honorary Members, 66; Sub- 
scribing Members, 900 ; Shareholders, 618. Total, 1,692. 

Of the subscribing members, only those paying dues* are 
enumerated, and these added to the number of shareholders 
paying dues, viz : 257 — make the present aggregate of 1,157 
paying members, thus showing a nominal decrease of 171 paying 



members since the last Annual Report. I say nominal, because 
it will be noticed that while there has been this apparent de- 
crease in the number of paying members, the amount of Quar- 
terly Dues received, during the past ten months, actually exceeds 
by $2,308 50, the whole amount received during the preceding 
term of fourteen months. 

DONATIONS. 

The Association is particularly indebted to the following 
named gentlemen, for valuable donations : 

Eugene Casserly, Esq. — Lord Kingsborough's Antiquities of Mexico, and Du 
Paix Monuments of New Spain ; 9 volumes imperial folio. A very rare and 
costly work. 

H. M. Naglee, Esq.— McPherson's Photographic Views in Rome ; 120 Plates on 
post folio. 

J. B. Williams, Esq. — Photographic Copies of the Limantour Documents. 

Hod. M. S. Latham, Hon. J. C. McKibben, and Hon. C. L. Scott. — Collection of 
Congressional Reports, etc. 

C. Wolcott Brooks, Esq. — Plaster Busts of Ancient and Modern Philosophers 
and Statesmen. 

Wm. K. Woods, Esq. — A Collection of Plaster Casts of Medallions of Kings of 
France, etc. 

READING ROOM. 

This important adjunct of the Institution has been, during the 
past year, kept fully up to its high standard. It is the most 
attractive and commodious one in the State ; and continues to 
be abundantly and promptly supplied with the leading Journals, 
Magazines and Reviews, both foreign and American — comprising 
such new serials as possess sufficient merit to justify their addi- 
tion to our already extensive range of periodical literature. 

CHESS ROOM. 

This Room is furnished with taste and convenience, and is 
regarded, very properly, I believe, as an agreeable, as well as 
useful, feature of our Association. It is consequently frequented 
by our members. 

LIBRARIANS. 

To Mr. H. H. Moore, the Librarian, and Mr. Daniel E. Webb, 
the Assistant Librarian, we are under obligations for the syste- 



10 

niatic, thorough and uniformly courteous manner in which they 
have discharged the duties of their office. The thanks of the 
Association are, moreover, additionally due to them, for the pre- 
paration of a new and admirably arranged — 

ANALYTICAL CATALOGUE. 

From this, it appears that the Library now contains, as before 

stated, nearly fourteen thousand volumes — an increase gratifying 

to ourselves, and surprising, when compared with the progress 

of the Mercantile Libraries of other cities : 

Boston founded in 1820, contained 19,000 volumes in 1860. 

New York 



Philadelphia . 
Cincinnati. . . 
Baltimore. . . . 

St. Louis 

Brooklyn.. . . 



" 1820, 


(i 


55,000 


(< 


it 


1821, 


K 


16,800 


it 


u 


" 183-1, 


it 


21,000 


u 


it 


" 1839, 


tt 


16,950 


a 


tt 


" 1846, 


it 


16,000 


it 


It 


" 1858, 


a 


17,500 


u 


it 


LECTURES 


• 









During the past year, two Courses of Public Lectures have 
been delivered, as follows : 

First Course. — By Rev. T. Starr King, May 10th 1860 ; subject, " Substance and 
Show." May 15th, " Life, Humor and Genius of Socrates." May 21st, " The 
Laws of Disorder." May 24th, " Personal Power and its Voices." 

Second Course.— By Rev. T. Starr King, Dec. 27th, 1860 ; subject, " Existence and 
Life." By the Rev. W. A. Scott, D. D., Jan. 3d, 1861 ; subject, " Pleasures of Uni- 
ting Literay Tastes with Busiuess Pursuits." By Jas. F. Bowman, Esq., Jan. 11th ; 
subject, " Poets, Poetry and the Ideal Faculty." By Rev. T. Starr King. January 
17 th ; subject, " Books and Reading." By Robert C. Rogers, Esq., January 24th ; 
subject, " Garibaldi." 

These Lectures were of a hio;h order of merit, and well re- 
ceived. 

It is suggested that the Course of Lectures might be, not only 
increased in number, but varied also in kind. Could not Lec- 
tures on scientific subjects — such as Astronomy, Geology, Miner- 
alogy, Chemistry, etc., properly treated and illustrated, be made 
to alternate usefully and agreeably with Lectures on Belles- 
Lettres, History, Biography, Travel, etc. ? 

I would also recur to the recommendation made by President 
McRuer, in the Seventh Annual Eeport : " That competent gen- 



11 

tleinen be invited from abroad, as well as from our own State, 
to lecture before the Association." Indeed, a correspondence 
has been opened, during the past year, for such purpose, but, as 
yet, no engagements have been perfected. Let us show, how- 
ever, even in this, that we are, what we claim to be, peculiarly 
cosmopolitan — liberal — and that we recognize only the sway of 
enlarged and enlighted influences in the Republic of Letters. 

C LASSES. 

It is undoubtedly known to you, that there has long been suc- 
cessfully introduced, into other Institutions of a similar character, 
the system of classes — whereby, the members can enjoy, at a 
trifling expense, the best instruction in studies at once useful and 
popular. Mr. President Woodworth, in the Fourth Annual Re- 
port, thus forcibly suggests the adoption of this system by our 
own Association : 

" The plan has been adopted with great success by kindred Associations in the 
Eastern cities, and I have no doubt it would meet with equal favor and success 
here in California. Young men of limited means may thus be enabled, at a very 
trifling expense, to perfect themselves in any of the branches of education wherein 
they may be deficient. All the various branches might thus be acquired at an 
expense about equivalent to the cost of any one of them studied separately by an 
individual student. Liberal arrangements can be made with the necessary Pro- 
ft-sors to conduct the classes, and ample accommodations can be obtained by them 
on the third floor of the building now occupied by the Association. The inaugu- 
ration of thi3 new feature could not but have the tendency to largely increase the 
number of members, as its privileges would, of course, be confined exclusively to 
members of the Association. I trust you will give this subject the serious consid- 
eration its importance demands, for I believe there are hundreds of young men 
who would be gladly willing to enrol their names upon your list of members, 
could this additional inducement be offered to them." 

CABINET. 

In connection with the lectures on Scientific Subjects, and the 
system of Classes, I would suggest the systematic formation of a 
scientifically arranged collection of specimens in Geology, Min- 
eralogy, etc. Such a cabinet could readily be made here, and 
would constitute not only a highly interesting, but most useful 
addition to our means of acquiring sound and profitable 
knowledge. 



12 



BUILDING A HALL. 



It will not be forgotten, that one of the first objects of our 
Association is, " the purchase of a suitable lot of land, and the 
erection thereon of a proper Building, or Hall, for the uses of 
the Association." Why not take some determinate step at once 
in the matter ? 

I earnestly suggest that we do — that we set apart some cer- 
tain Fund — say the Lecture Fund, or proceeds arising from the 
Lectures, for such purpose. Thus, the measure, once definitely 
resolved upon and taken, will, in accordance with the general 
spirit of the Association, be vigorously pursued, and result 
speedily in the realization of this great project. 

STOCK. 

There have been issued 618 shares of Stock ; of these, only 
257 pay dues. It is suggested that the necessary steps be takeu 
to call them all in, and vest the ownership of them exclusively 
in the Association. As many stockholders have already ex- 
pressed their willingness to surrender up their shares, there is 
no doubt but that, by well considered efforts and tact, the above 
suggestion could be speedily carried out with complete success. 
It would follow, necessarily, also, that no more stock should be 
issued, and that the Constitution should be correspondingly 
amended. 

REVISION OF CONSTITUTION. 

This whole subject was referred to a competent Committee, 
whose Report will, I understand, be presented to the Associa- 
tion this evening. 

DEATHS. 

During the past year, two of our Life Members have been re- 
moved from us by death. Frederick P. Tracy, Esq., and Gen. 
J. P. Haven. 

Gen. Haven was the first Vice-President of the Association, 
and always manifested the utmost interest in its prosperity. On 
the occasion of his decease, suitable resolutions were passed and 
entered upon the Minutes of the Board. 



13 

BOARD OF DIRECTORS. 

The Vice-President, Wm. R. Garrison, Esq., having left for 
the Atlantic States, the vacancy thereby created was filled by 
the election of Wm. Norris, Esq. C. Wolcott Brooks, Esq., 
being about to leave on a visit to the East, also resigned, and 
the vacancy was filled by the election of Monroe Ashbury, Esq. 
Frank Baker, Esq., also resigned, on account of proposed ab- 
sence ; but this vacancy has not been filled. 

The Annual Election, held on Monday, January 21st, 1861, 
resulted in the choice of the following named gentlemen : 

President JAS. W. WHITE. 

Vice-President THOS. J. LAMB. 

Treasurer BENJ. SMITH. 

Recording Secretary E. H. J ACQUELIN. 

Corresponding Secretary WALTER MARTINEAU. 

Directors.— Maj. H. Leonard, A. L. Edwards, John S. Davies, J. P. Nourse, R. C. 
Rogers, J. Lawrence Pool, J. M. Strobridge, J. C. Johnson, J. M. McNulty, M. D. 

Iii conclusion, gentlemen, and fellow members, we may be per- 
mitted to congratulate ourselves on the healthy and prosperous 
condition of our Association. The brief retrospect, which has 
just been presented to you, of our progress during the past year, 
shows that we have fully kept pace with the onward march of 
the intelligent enterprises of our own day and City and State. 
Let these pleasing reflections, however, serve only as incentives 
to still greater, more energetic and unremitting action, Let us 
as well united as each one in his own sphere, lose no opportu- 
nity of carrying out the objects of our Association — urging its 
onward movement, and developing its usefulness and its influ- 
ence. In a word, let us, animated by the spirit of a generous 
emulation, work constantly and heartily together, in the en- 
deavor to place the Mercantile Library Association of San Fran- 
cisco among the foremost of kindred Institutions. 

WM. H. STEVENS, 

President. 



14 



TABULAR STATISTICS 

Showing the progress of the Mercantile Library Jissociation, from 
its organization in January, 1853, to March, 1860. 



1853. 
1854. 
1855. 
1856. 
1857. 
1858. 
1859. 
1860. 

1853. 
1854. 
1855. 
1856. 

1857. 
1858. 
1859. 
1860. 
1861. 

1854. 
1855. 
1856. 

1857. 
1858. 
1859. 
1860. 
1861. 

1854. 
1855. 
1856. 

1857. 
1858. 
1859. 
1860. 



Receipts 



.$10,858 50. Expenditures $10,726 51 



13,387 30. 
9,015 85. 
10,300 00. 
11.777 87. 
12.089 15. 
16.854 82. 
15.604 50. 



11,838 02 

8,747 96 

8,989 27 

12.474 73 

11.704 09 

19,045 16 

16,482 20 



GROWTH OF THE LIBRARY. 

No. of Volumes at the commencement of the year. .1,500 

..2,705 
..3,315 
..3,833 
..6,135 
. . 8.447 
. 10,066 
.11,486 
.13,821 



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INCREASE OP MEMBERS. 

No. of Members at the commencement of the year 



a 
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. 392 
. 552 

. 550 
. 1250 
.1176 
.1319 
.1817 
.1694 



OPERATIONS OF THE LIBRARY. 

No. of Volumes taken out 3,371 

8,367 

10,466 

17.528 

17,321 

, 21,903 

25,757 

The terms of Membership in this Association, are, for a Subscribing Member, an 
initiation fee of $2, and quarterly dues of S3, payable in advance. Shares of $25 
subject to the same assessments as Subscribing Memberships. Life Memberships, 
$100, without further assessments. Life Members are also entitled to have two 
shares of stock issued to them without charge. 



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15 
REGULATIONS OF THE READING ROOM. 



Sec. 1. — The Reading Room shall be open every day through- 
out the year, from 8 o'clock A. M., to 11 o'clock P. M. 

Sec. 2. — No member shall assume the liberty of arranging the 
books of the Library, or periodicals on the tables, or of per- 
forming any of the duties that devolve upon the Librarian. 

Sec. 3. — None but members shall be allowed the privilege 
of the Reading Room, unless introduced by a member of the 
Association. 

Sec. 4. — Any member may have the privilege of introducing a 
friend not a resident of the city, whose name shall be registered 
by the Librarian in a book kept for that purpose, and who shall 
receive a ticket of admission to the Reading Room tor the term 
of four weeks. 

Sec 5. — No member shall be allowed the privilege of the 
Reading Room, unless all dues and forfeituress incurred are 
liquidated. 

Sec. 6.' — No member shall be allowed to remove papers from 
the files, or books, plates or periodicals from the Reading Room. 

Sec. 7. — Any member who shall mutilate the periodicals or 
papers placed on the files or tables in the Reading Room, or re- 
move them therefrom, shall be liable to fine and expulsion. 

Sec. 8. — Should a member transgress any article in these Reg- 
ulations, he shall be reported to the Board of Directors, who may 
take such measures thereon as they may deem expedient. 

Sec. 9. — The Regulations of the Library and Reading Room 
shall not be altered, amended, or suspended, unless by the votes 
of six members of the Board of Directors, present at a stated 
meeting, notice being given for that purpose. 



REGULATIONS OF THE LIBRARY. 



The Library shall be open every day throughout the year, from 
9 o'clock, A. M., to 10 o'clock, P. M., excepting Sundays, the 
Fourth of July, Thanksgiving Day, Christmas and New Year. 



16 

A member may receive, applying personally, or by his written 
order, one volume, if it be a folio or quarto ; and two, if an oc- 
tavo, or duodecimo, or volume of less size. 

Every member may detain each book or set delivered as afore- 
said, if it be a folio or quarto, four weeks ; an octavo, three 
weeks ; or a book or set of less size, two weeks ; except new 
publications, which, until they have been in the Library two 
months, shall not be detained — an octavo longer than two weeks, 
and books of less size one week, and which shall not be renewed. 
No book shall be reserved by the Librarian for any Director or 
Member. 

Any member who shall detain a book or set longer than the 
time above limited, respectively, shall forfeit and pay to the 
Librarian for every day a volume is so detained, if it be a folio, 
twenty cents ; a quarto, fifteen cents ; an octavo, ten cents ; if it 
be a duodecimo, or smaller volume or pamphlet, five cents. 

If any member lose or injure a book, he shall make the same 
good to the Librarian ; and if the book lost or injured be one of 
a set, he shall pay to the Librarian, for the use of the Associa- 
tion, the full value of said set, and may thereupon receive the 
remaining volumes as his property. 

No member shall be permitted to receive a book from the 
Library until he shall have paid all sums due from him to the 
Association, and made good all damages and losses which he 
may have occasioned. 

Books of Reference, and such others as may from time to time 
be specially designated by the Board, shall not be taken from 
the Library, except by special permission of a member of the 
Board of Directors ; provided, however, that Newspapers, Ency- 
clopaedias, Cyclopaedias, Dictionaries and Atlasses, shall, in no 
case, be taken from the Library Rooms. 

Any member wishing to withdraw from the Association, must 
inform the Librarian of it, see that his resignation is registered, 
and pay up his dues and fees, else he will be considered as con- 
tinuing a member, and charged accordingly, unless otherwise 
ordered by the Board of Directors. 



OFFICERS— PAST AND PRESENT. 



. • 



OFFICERS FOR 1853-4. 

President D. S. Turner. 

Vice-President J. P. Haven. 

Recording Secretary W. H. Stevens. 

Corresponding Secretary Dr. H. Gibbons. 

Treasurer C. E. Bowers, Jr. 

Directors— -E. E. Dunbar, J. B. Crockett, E. P. Flint, D. H. 
Haskell. 

Librarian W. D. Bickman. 

Assistant J. J. Tayker. 

OFFICERS FCR 1854-5. 

President D. S. Turner. 

Vice-President H. Channing Beals. 

Recording Secretary W. H. Stevens. 

Corresponding Secretary F. A. Wood worth. 

Treasurer C. L. Strong. 

Directors— W. R. Wadsworth, P. A. Roach, J. H. Purkitt, E. 
P. Flint, F. S. Hawley, W. MacMichael, D. Olyphant Vail, A. 
G. Randall, J. H. Gardner. 

Librarian Horace Davis. 

Assistant J. J. Tayker. 

OFFICERS FOR 1855-6. 

President Henry M. Hale. 

Vice-President , W. H. Stevens. 

Recording Secretary J. H. Gardiner. 

Corresponding Secretary F. A. Woodworth. 

Treasurer Spear Riddell. 

Directors — J. H. Purkitt, Ira P. Rankin, A. W. McKee, J. B. 
Newton, R. D. W. Davis, R. E. Brewster, W. A. Macondray, J. 
M. Coughlin, W. R. Wadsworth. 

Librarian E. De Sola. 

Assistant J.J. Tayker. 



18 

OFFICERS FOR 1856-7. 

President F. A. Woodworth. 

Vice-President E. H. Washburn. 

Recording Secretary W. C. Hyde. 

Corresponding Secretary E. H. Howard. 

Treasurer W. R. Garrison. 

Directors— J. G. Kittle, J. H. Coghill, H. D. Oliphant, C. J. 
Dempster, H. D. Walbridge, T. J. L. Smiley, W. J. Bailey, J. 
A. Donohoe, G. H. Kellogg. 

Librarian H. H. Moore. 

Assistant J. J. Tayker. 

OFFICERS FOR 1857-8. 

President Ira P. Rankin. 

Vice-President Andrew W. McKee. 

Recording Secretary II. D. Oliphant. 

Corresponding Secretary J. M. Shotwell. 

Treasurer Jules David. 

Directors — P. Yerplank, Jr., C. H. Raymond, M. J. Burke, 
Samuel Hubbard, T. J. Lamb, George Howes, Wm. Arrington, 
Benjamin Haynes, W. F. Parker. 

Librarian . . . H. H. Moore. 

Assistants D. E. Webb, J. J. Tayker. 



OFFICERS FOR 185l8-9. 

I 
S 

President E. H. Washburn. 

Vice-President > Joseph A. Donohoe. 

Recording Secretary Samuel Hubbard. 

Corresponding Secretary. B. Watkins Leigh. 

Treasurer Joseph M. Shotwell. 

Directors — A. L. Tubbs, C. H. Raymond, Thomas S. Miller, 
Joseph S. Paxson, Julius K. Rose, Albert Miller, R. B. Swain, 
P. T. Southworth, Jacob B. Moore. 

Librarian H. H. Moore. 

Assistants D. E. Webb, J. J. Tayker, 



19 

OFFICERS FOR 1859-60. 

President D. C. McRuer. 

Vice-President Henry Carlton, Jr. 

Recording Secretary Henry C. Lee. 

Corresponding Secretary Edward J. Pringle. 

Treasurer T. 0. Banks. 

Directors— F. A. Holman, J. C. Stone, E. J. Muygridge, Joshua 
Barker, J. W. White, Henry M. Haiglit, J. B. Swasey, S. C. 
Bigelow, Joseph Hobart. 

Librarian H. H. Moore. 

Assistants D. E. Webb, J. J. Tayker. 

OFFICERS FOR 1860-61. 

President Wm. H. Stevens. 

Vice-President Wm. R. Garrison. 

Corresponding Secretary R. B. Swain. 

Recording Secretary Edw. Hunt. 

Treasurer J- G. Kellogg. 

Directors— Chas. Wolcott Brooks, Frank Baker, D. P. Belknap, 
William Norris, James W. J. Pierson, John Shaw, H. C. Macy, 
Charles R. Bond, Thomas Bennett. 

Librarian H. H. Moore. 

Assistants D. E. Webb, J. J. Tayker. 



• 



NINTH 



ANNUAL REPORT 



OF THE 



PRESIDENT 



OF THE 



Oi 




mmttiie Jilrrarg ^wMmt, 



OF 



SAN FHA.]SrOISCO. 



WITH THE 



TREASURER AND LIBRARIAN'S REPORT, AND 
LIST OF OFFICERS FOR 1862. 



SAN FRANCISCO: 

PRINTED BY CHAELES F. BOBBINS & CO., 

413 TO 417 CLAY STREET. 
1862. 



LIST OF OFFICERS 



OF THK 



m 



CL.SJ (?3 <S SO 



FOR 1862. 



"President : 
JACOB UNDERHILL. 



Vice President : Treasurer : 

WILLIAM NORRIS. CAMILO MARTIN. 

Corresponding Secretary : Recording Secretary : 

SYDNEY V. SMITH. . WILLIAM M. NOYES. 

Directors : 

Major HIRAM LEONARD, JOHN B. NEWTON, 

P. L. WEAVER, JOHN C. MERRILL, 

C. W. HATHAWAY, JOHN WIGHTMAN, 

WILLIAM ALVORD, CHAS. D. HAVEN, 
THOMAS BENNET, M. D. 

Librarian : Assistant Librarian : 

H. H. MOORE. D. E. WEBB. 

Collector : Janitor : 

J. J. TAYKER. 0. H. CANFIELD. 



AISTNUA.L REPOET 

OF THE 

TREASURER 

OF THE 



Balance Cash on hand January 31, 1861 $880 55 

RECEIPTS. 

Quarterly Dues received from Members $12,462 00 

Initiation Fees received from new members 802 00 

Life Membership received from one member 100 00 

Lectures, receipts from course of 1861 2,320 25 

Books sold, lost, etc., etc 123 73 

Catalogues, sales 45 00 

Total receipts for the year $15,852 98 

$16,733 53 

EXPENDITURES. 

Library account, — for books, magazines, etc $1,219 34 

Expense account, — rent, gas, fuel, etc 5,291 77 

Salaries, — Librarian and Assistants 4,909 50 

Furniture - 43 00 

Printing 130 25 

Catalogues 497 23 

Insurance 350 50 

Lectures, — paid Lecturers, advertising, etc. This amount 
remaining due January 31, 1861, from course of 

1860 $1,077 50 

Expenses of course of 1861 1,593 13 2,670 63 

Total expenditures for the year $15,112 22 

Balance in hands of Treasurer $ 1,621 31 

BEN J. SMITH, Treasurer. 
Son Francisco, January 27, 1862. 



LIBRARIAN'S REPORT. 



Mercantile Library Rooms, ) 
San Francisco, January 21th, 1S62. > 



To the Members of the Mercantile Library Association : 

I have the honor of submitting to you the following Report 
of the statistics and operations of the Library and Reading 
Rooms, from the date of my last Annual Report, (January 28th, 
1861), to the present time. 

The whole number of books loaned from the Library during 
the year, was 31,955, which were classified as follows, viz : — 

Romance, 21,869 vols, Belles-Lettres 1,389 vole. 

Biography, 2,775 " Poetry 527 '• 

Travels 1,674 " Religion 163 " 

History, 1,556 " Bound Periodicals 1811 " 

Science, 1.153 " Miscellaneous 726 " 

The whole number of books loaned in the course of the year, 
was 6,24S greater than in the preceding one. The largest num- 
ber of volumes loaned in any single month, was 3,150, in March, 
and the smallest, 2,383, in September, 1861. 

There were 1,164 volumes added to the Library during the 
year, which were classified and arranged into the following de- 
partments, making the numbers in each : 

Romance 3,044 vols. Poetry 985 vols. 

Travel* 1,323 " Religion 492 " 

History 1*449 " Law and Politics 970 " 

Biography 1,156 " Reference, Miscellaneous. 1747 " 

Arts and Sciences 1,341 " Bound Newspapers 169 " 

Belles-Lettres 1,042 " Bound Periodicals 1267 " 

which makes a sum total of 14,985 volumes in all the depart- 
ments of the Library. A deduction from this number, of about 
500 volumes, should be made, for books which have been worn 
out or lost since the foundation of the Library. 



Many additions have been made to the Magazines and News- 
papers supplied to the Reading Rooms ; including the more im- 
portant ones commenced during the year. 

Early in the year a complete catalogue of the Library was 
published. 

During the year, the Association has been presented with 
many valuable Books, Works of Art, etc., etc., by the following 
gentlemen, Libraries, etc. : 



Hon. W. M. Gwin, 

J. S. Butler, 

J. P. Chamberlain, 

Rev. S. C. Damon, 

Charles F. Robbing, 

J. L. Williams, 

H. Payot, 

W. A. Wells, 

Hon. Milton S. Latham, 

Hon. E. D. Baker, 

W. B. Farwell, 

F. A. Woodworth, 

Col. H. M. Naglee, 

D. E. Appleton, 
J. B. Hayes, 
Capt. E. C. Nickels, 

Rt. Rev. W. Ingraham Kipp, 

E. R. Campbell, 
Prof. A. D. Bache, 
J. B. Marshall, 

J. L. Davis, 



S. W. Holladay, 

S. H. Parker, 

J. Smith Homans, 

A. T. Langton, 

Prof. W. P. Blake, 

Lieut. R. S. Williamson, 

H. G. Langley, 

Towne & Bacon, 

H. M. Hale, 

M. S. Latham, 

W. C. Stratton, 

H. Burgess, 

Joseph Heco, 

W. Coggeshall, 

John Ferguson, 

E. Viscner, 

J. W. Osborn, 

Lady Jane Franklin, 

Horace Davis, 

W. H. Stevens. 



The whole number of members at present belonging to the 
Association is 1,725 ; classified as follows, viz : Life Members, 
106; Honorary Members, 70; Shareholders, 618 ; Subscribing 
Members, 931. This shows an increase of 31 paying members 
above the number reported last year. 

Respectfully, 

H. H. MOORE, Librarian. 



ANNUAL REPORT. 

DELIVERED BY JAMES W. WHITE, PRESIDENT. 

JANUARY 27th, 1862. 



Gentlemen of the Mercantile Library Association : 

In obedience to the requirements of the Constitution, it be- 
comes my duty to submit for your approval, the Ninth Annual 
Report, containing a statement of proceedings during the past 
year, the leading facts connected with our present position, and 
such comments and suggestions as seem best calculated to en- 
hance the prosperity and usefulness of the Association. I take 
much satisfaction in assuring you at the outset, of the continued 
prosperity of the Association, and its entire freedom from all 
causes of embarrassment. 

FINANCES. 

On entering upon our official duties, we found the liabilities 
of the Association to be as follows, viz : — 

Bills due on account of Lectures $ 838 00 

Bills due for furnace, labor, etc 583 85 

Bills due Wells, Fargo & Co 21 00 

Bills due for fuel 41 25 

Bills due for gas 155 05 

Bills due for advertising 265 00 

Bills due for newspapers, periodicals, etc 112 25 

Bills due for printing, binding, etc 1 75 50 

Bills due for rent of rooms 200 00 

Bills due for Analytical Catalogue 371 86 

Bills due for salaries 469 20 

Bills due John Wiley, of New York, for books 570 64 

Total $3,803 60 

Deducting balance in the hands of the Treasurer, January 28th, 

1861, see his report of that date 880 55 

Leaves a balance unprovided for at the date of the last Annual 

Meeting, of $2,923 05 



9 

The regular monthly revenue of the Association at the begin- 
ing of the year, was about $1,100, and the current monthly ex- 
penses, $S25 ; leaving a balance of $275 to be applied, monthly, 
to the payment of this debt. 

Our Treasurer, Mr. Smith, generously offered to advance to 
the Association, the sum of $1,500, or such sums as would be 
required, from time to time, to meet the most urgent demands, 
until we should be in funds. The advances to be without in- 
terest. This offer was gladly accepted by the Board of Direction, 
and we, in your name, return thanks to Mr. Smith for the valua- 
ble assistance he has rendered the Association during the past 
year. 

This condition of our finances, however, has imposed upon us 
in all our expenditures, a rigid economy. It has been the aim of 
the retiring Board of Government, by a prudent and economical 
administration of the affairs of the Association, to preserve it 
from all financial embarrassment, and transfer it to the care of 
their successors in office, with all its prospects and usefulness 
unimpaired. The Association is now in a position to take care 
of itself, and it should be a fixed policy of its government to 
make the expenditures come within the receipts ; thereby ena- 
bling each retiring Board to transfer the trust committed to their 
care, to their successors, free and unincumbered. 

The Treasurer's report exhibits the present fioancial condition 
of the Association. It will be seen by the report, that our total 
receipts for the year have been $15,852 98. Adding the balance 
($880 55) in the Treasury at the commencement of the year, 
gives a total of $16,733 53. 

The total disbursements, by the Treasurer, during the year, have 

been $15,112 22 

To which 1 add, unpaid bills, in the hands of the Librarian 192 75 

Amount due John Wiley, New York, for books 418 36 

Total expenditures for the year $15,723 33 

Balance on hand in the Treasury, after paying all bills to date. . . 1,010 17 

$16,733 5 

The average monthly receipts for the year, from all sources 
have been $1,321. The present monthly revenue of the Asso- 



10 

ciation amounts to $1,250, and the current expenses are $835, 
leaving a balance, monthly, of $415 to be applied to the purchase 
of books, etc., 

BOOKS. 

The number of volumes reported at your last annual meeting, 
was 13,821. Since that time, there has been added, by purchase, 
666 volumes, and by donation, 498 volumes. The total number 
of volumes is 14,985. Owing to the embarrassed state of our 
finances, the Committee on Books and Donations have been 
unable to make requisitions for such books as they desired. 

The arrangement with Mr. Wiley of New York, authorizing 
him to send us, at once, copies of new and popular works, has 
been continued, so that we have been enabled to meet the en- 
quiries for nearly every new book of merit. 

By reference to the Librarian's Report, we learn that the 
aggregate number of books withdrawn from the Library during 
the past year is 31,955, showing an increase of 20 per cent, over 
the preceding year, and 32 per cent, more than in 1859. I ap- 
pend a comparative statement, compiled from the Librarian's Re- 
port of last year and the one presented this evening, showing 
the per centage of the whole number of books taken, during the 
past two years, from each department of letters : 

1860. 1861. 

Romance 63 3-10 per cent. 68 4-10 per cent, 

Travels 06 5-10 " 05 3-10 

Biography 08 6-10 » 08 6-10 

History .- 04 2-10 " 04 9-10 

Belles' Lettres 04 6-10 " 04 2-10 

Science and Art 04 2-10 " 03 6-10 

Poetry 02 2-10 " 016-10 

Miscellaneous 05 2-10 « 02 8-10 

Religion 00 7-10 » 00 6-10 



>< 



100 100 

From this showing you will perceive that it is a matter of no 
little difficulty to determine what books shall be bought. 

In the selection of books for the Library — such as will se- 
cure the substantial, permanent interest of the Association — it 
requires experience, an intelligent judgment, and not only a 
knowledge of its present wants, but a wise forecasting of the 
future. 



11 

There is one department of the Library to which I would 
call especial attention: it is the Reference Department. We 
cannot over-estimate the importance of this feature of our Li- 
brary. The number of persons to whom a library of reference 
is indispensable is constantly increasing, and it behooves us to 
afford them every facility within our power. 

I would therefore earnestly recommend, that as fast as our 
finances will permit, without detriment to the other departments 
of the Library, duplicates of standard works, and such books of 
reference as are most needed, be procured, and placed perma- 
nently on the shelves of that department. 

The accumulation on our shelves of duplicate copies and su- 
perfluous works has increased to some extent, which can be dis- 
posed of by sale or donation. I would respectfully recommend 
that a committee be appointed annually, to select from books of 
that character such as would be suitable, and douate them to the 
Orphan Asylums, Industrial School, and other charitable institu- 
tions of our City. 

In this connection I would state, that the Analytical Catalo- 
gue mentioned in my predecessor's report, was completed in 
February last, and we have had 1,500 copies printed. These 
copies are for sale at the desk of the Librarian at 50 cents each, 
which is merely the cost of publishing, and as they place before 
you at a glance the contents of your valuable Library, I respect- 
fully urge every member of the Association to procure a copy, 
thereby benefiting themselves, and materially lessening the ex- 
pense of publication to the Association. 

MEMBERS. 

The number of members belonging to the Association at the 
date of the last annual report was 1694. Since that period we 
have lost by death, 8 ; removal from the city, 123 ; withdrawal, 
290 ; and have added to our membership, 452 — showing a net 
gain for the year of 31 members. 

It is a matter of great regret, that we are compelled to re- 
cord each year the withdrawal of so many members. Why they 
have withdrawn, it may not be our business to enquire, but 
whatever reasons they may have, we cannot grant that anything 



12 

short of actual inability to contribute relieves them of the obli- 
gation to renew their membership. The proportion of the num- 
ber whose means will not permit them to continue the payment 
of the small subscription called for must be exceedingly small. 

The great benefits derived from a connection with this Asso- 
ciation are so cheaply bought, that retrenchment in some other 
line of expenditures seems better than to forego the advantages 
which can be here enjoyed. It, however, shows the necessity of 
increased effort on the part of the members at large in soliciting 
new members from among their acquaintances. A great deal 
can be accomplished in this way with but very little effort, so 
that each year may show a large increase in our membership. 

During the past year some of our life members have been re- 
moved from us by death, viz. : George W. P. Bissell, Theodore 
Payne, Col. E. D. Baker and G. B. Post. 

ROOMS. 

In compliance with the term of our lease, the owner of the 
building has repainted the rooms, under the direction and super- 
vision of the Committee on Library and Rooms, and to their en- 
tire satisfaction. 

The Reading Room has fully maintained its character and 
usefulness without any marked increase in its resources. It con- 
tinues to be supplied with the best periodicals of the day, the 
leading foreign and domestic journals, etc. 

I take occasion to state here that Mr. G. H. Bell has con- 
tracted to furnish the Association with all the periodicals, news- 
papers, etc., required for the rooms, at a scale of prices 15 per 
cent, less than those proposed by the parties who have heretofore 
supplied us. Annexed to the contract is a schedule containing the 
titles of the papers, periodicals, etc. to be furnished, with prices. 
Also, a bond in the sum of $600 for the faithful performance of 
the contract. 

The Chess Room continues to be a popular place of resort, 
and has been supplied with all that seemed necessary to make it 
attractive and comfortable to its frequenters. 

The Library Room has been free to all, without any new res- 
trictions ; believing, as we do, that the utmost liberality towards 



13 

the members, consistent with our laws and regulations, should 
characterize the government of the Association. 

LECTURES. 

In view of the embarassed condition of our finances, and im- 
pressed with the belief that " home productions are equal if not 
superior to the imported article," the Board of Directors have 
not deemed it advisable to open a correspondence with lecturers 
from abroad ; but concluded to invite some of our distinguished 
speakers to lecture for us, which resulted in the delivery, under 
the auspices of the Association, of five lectures as follows, viz. : 

March 19. — The Rev. Thomas Starr King. Subject : Genius of Daniel 
Webster and his Relations to the American Constitution. 

July 9. — The Rev. Thomas Starr King. Subject : Two Declarations of In- 
dependence — 1776 and 1861. 

July 24. — W. P. Blake, Esq. Subject : Physical Geography of California. 

August 7. — Robert C Rogers, Esq. Subject : Wiiifield Scott. 

August 19. — The Rev. Thomas Starr King. Subject: Confederate States — 
Old and Neiv. 

Mr. King repeated the last-named lecture, at the request of 
the lecture committee, on the evening of August 27th, without 
charge to the Association, for which he is entitled to your grate- 
ful thanks. 

In December last we received a communication from Park 
Benjamin, Esq., expressing a desire to visit San Francisco and 
deliver, under the auspices of the Association, a course of lec- 
tures ; provided arrangements satisfactory to both parties could 
be agreed upon. 

In reply to this communication, Mr. Benjamin was informed 
that our term of office was about to expire ; that we deemed 
it unadvisable to enter into any arrangements that would bind 
our successors; but would refer the matter to them, and ask their 
favorable consideration. 

The subject of lectures is one that claims your earnest con- 
sideration, as it forms a prominent interest of the library. By 
common consent it has been a custom with those having charge 
of your affairs, to provide a series of lectures to be delivered be- 
fore the Association each year. It is true that the principal ob- 



14 

ject of these lectures is to add to the revenues of the Associa- 
tion, and by that means extend its power for more general use- 
fulness : beyond this, however, there are other ends involved in 
this subject, which demand your attention. The accumulation 
of books on your shelves, still quietly but steadily progressing, 
dispels any lingering doubt you may have entertained of the con- 
tinued and complete success of your undertaking. The possession 
of so much literary treasure, gathered under difficulty and with- 
in so brief a period, gives you abundant reason for both gratitude 
and pride ; but the founders of the library intended its uses 
should be progressive, and embrace subjects other than that of 
books. Even at that early day, they, too, foresaw that lectures 
delivered in public, under your auspices, would invest the Asso- 
ciation with new and wider interest, and strengthen its claim for 
popular favor, and they judged wisely. To foster a love of lite- 
rature is the chief purpose of your Association, and while these 
lectures are remunerative in a pecuniary point of view, they also 
have their use in elevating the standard of popular taste. You 
all remember wityi what force your lecturers presented you with 
scenes from the lives of Webster, Clay, Scott, and other of our 
venerated sages and heroes ; scenes teeming with interest, and 
furnishing the keystone to many of their acts in forum and field. 
These lectures were well received by the public, and the records of 
your associations show some of their beneficial results — in in- 
creasing its means, in attracting to it a more general interest, 
and adding to its roll of members. 

While these facts are presented for your consideration, I con- 
sider it my duty to remind you that it is beyond the power of 
your Board of Directors to obtain for the Association the com- 
plete success and full benefit of any course of lectures, so much 
to be desired, unless they are actively seconded by your own 
individual efforts. 

The retiring Board felt a full measure of pride in this depart- 
ment of their labor. They brought before you lecturers of 
acknowledged ability, and omitted no step which, in their judg- 
ment, was needed to offer to the public lectures alike worthy of 
its patronage and creditable to your association. 



15 

DONATIONS. 

Year after year we have the pleasure of recording the names 
of those who have signalized their interest in the Association by 
valuable donations. Among those who deserve your especial 
thanks, I beg to name — 

Hon. Wm. M. Gwin, 166 volumes Congressional documents, reports, etc. 

Hon. Milton S. Latham, 57 volumes Congressional documents, etc. 

Lieut. R. S. Williamson, 35 volumes of scientific and miscellaneous books, 
and 31 scientific pamphlets and reports. 

Joseph Heco, Japanese costume books and a collection of colored plates. 

John Ferguson, 130 volumes miscellaneous books. 

Col. H. M. Naglee, a 'large magnifying glass, a curious polyglot volume, 
casts of Medallions, etc. 

Horace Davis, 14 volumes Government documents and reports, and 52 
miscellaneous magazines and pamplets. 

Col. E. D. Baker and W~. B. Farwell. Congressional Globe, Government 
reports and statistics. 

BUILDING FOE THE USES OF THE ASSOCIATION. 

Every retiring President, since the organization of the Asso- 
ciation, has called our attention to the importance of adopting 
some plan for securing a lot, and the erection of a building for 
the uses of the Association. But much as this want has been 
felt, and much as it has been urged upon us, no step has yet 
been taken towards attaining such a consummation. Various 
plans have been suggested, such as a "joint stock building asso- 
ciation," " setting aside a certain portion of our revenues," etc. 
The plan of setting apart, for this purpose, any portion of the usual 
revenues of the Association, I consider entirely out of the ques- 
tion. Our current expenses and requisitions for books will re- 
quire every dollar of our income from the regular and usual 
sources. We must look about us for other and more certain 
means of accomplishing this much desired object. 

The lease of our present rooms was made for a term of three 
years from February 8th, 1860, with a privilege of renewal for 
a like term. This allows us to remain in our present location 
four years from the 8th proximo. Before the expiration of this 
term, we shall find the Association has outgrown its accommoda- 
tions, and ampler ones must then necessarily be provided. Before 
that time expires, this Association should have a building of its 
own, largo enough to accommodate its wants for all future time- 



16 

If you ask, how shall this end be attained? — what means shall 
we employ to accomplish it ? I answer that we have the means 
within ourselves, and can easily attain the end by the united and 
determined efforts of the members at large. Our roll of mem- 
bers now number 1/F25. Let us suppose that to-day an account 
be opened on the Treasurer's books, called the Building Fund 
Account, to which shall be credited all the collections that can be 
annually realized for this specific purpose ; and that each mem- 
ber pays a monthly assessment of fifty cents to be placed to the 
credit of this fund. This assessment alone would give us at the 
end of this year the sum of $10,350. Let this fund be invested 
for revenue, and in no case be diverted from its appropriate pur- 
pose. This scheme if continued for four years, will, with the in- 
terest on the annual accumulations, result in a fund of at least 
$45,000. With this amount in hand we can form a " Joint Stock 
Building Association," and be in a position to take stock sufficient 
to control the property, and be assured of a permanent resting 
place for our treasures. 

Is this scheme impracticable? Is there a member of this As- 
sociation who cannot afford to pay the amount named, to secure 
this grand element of strength and success? To me, the plan 
seems entirely practicable, and only requires a well concerted 
and well directed action on the part of each and every member 
to secure its accomplishment. Besides, if we show a disposition 
to help ourselves, we may with justice appeal to our fellow-citi- 
zens for support, and be sure of a favorable response. When we 
consider the magnitude of the Library ; what means of improve- 
ment have been placed within the reach of those who might 
otherwise have been debarred from them ; what an influence for 
good this institution has exercised in this community — I think we 
have a right to ask their contributions and influence to enable us 
to strengthen its foundation and promote its usefulness. 

INSURANCE . 

The property of the Association is insured as follows, viz. : 

Phoenix Insurance Company, Hartford, Conn $5,000 

Hartford " " " " 5,000 

JEtna " " " " 5,000 

Manhattan " " New York 5.000 

Relief » " " 5,000 

Total $25,000 



17 

CHANGES IN THE BOAKD OF DIEECTOES. 

During the year the following changes have occurred in the 
Board : 

The Corresponding Secretary, Walter Martineau, Esq., removing from 
the city, resigned, and Robert C. Rogers, Esq., was advanced to the vacancy, 
and James Freeborn, Esq., elected a Director in his stead. 

Mr. J. Lawrence Pool and Dr J. M. McNulty, on account of proposed 
long absence from the city, resigned, and the vacancies thereby created were 
filled by the election of Samuel Hubbard, Esq., and Dr. F. A. Holman. 

LIBEAEIANS, ETC. 

Mr. H. H. Moore, as Librarian, and Mr. D. E. Webb, as As- 
sistant Librarian, still occupy their positions, and have been faith- 
ful in the discharge of their duties during the year. 

Mr. J. J. Tayker, who has long been the faithful servant of 
the Association, finding that his health would not permit him to 
discharge the duties of both Janitor and Collector, asked to be 
relieved from attendance on the rooms, and appointed Collector 
with an allowance of five per cent, on the amount collected. His 
request was granted. This change involved the necessity of ap- 
pointing a Janitor, with a salary of $75 per month, which in- 
creases our current monthly expenses in the sum of $33. 

AMENDMENTS TO THE CONSTITUTION. 

At the last annual meeting of the Association, the committee 
appointed to prepare amendments to the constitution, reported a 
series of amendments and asked for further time to consider an 
amendment to Sec. 4, Article III. of the constitution, which was 
granted. At a subsequent meeting of the Association the com- 
mittee made an additional report, but no definite action has yet 
been taken upon either of them. 

The two most important amendments reported by the com- 
mittee, the adoption of which by the Association I would res- 
pectfully recommend, read as follows, viz. : 

Amend clause 1st, of section 1st, which reads, "All elections shall be by 
ballot, except when otherwise ordered, and be made by such of the members 
as shall attend for that purpose in person, or by legal power of attorney," by 
striking out the words : " Or by legal power of attorney," and substituting 
therefore the words, " And by stockholders either in person or by proxy." 

Amend section 4, article 3, so as to read, " All shares of stock on which 
2 



18 

the regular assessments of three dollars per quarter, payable in advance, shall 
be due and unpaid, shall be liable to forfeiture and sale ; and such shares may 
at any time be declared forfeited and be sold for the payment of the assess- 
ments due thereon, under such regulations as may be provided by the by-laws. 
And the Board of Directors or the Directory may make such by-laws as may 
be necessary to carry out the object of this section. 

The object of this amendment is explained by the committee, 
who say : " The largest portion of the property of the institution 
is derived from other sources than the investment by, or the oper- 
ations of, the stockholders, and this additional property should be 
guaranteed to belong, as it undoubtedly in all equity does, to the 
Association, and not to the few stockholders." 

In this connection I would state that there have been issued 
620 shares of stock ; of these only 225 pay dues. If any action 
is to be taken on the proposed amendments, it should be done at 
once, so that the Constitution of the Association can be put into 
shape for printing, in pamphlet form, for the use of members, 
thereby enabling them to learn what laws govern the institution, 
and be better prepared to conform 'to the same. At present 
there is not a fair and complete copy of the Constitution of this 
Association to be found in the library. It is only to be found in 
a fragmentary form, bound together with some old catalogue of 
the library. 

The annual election of officers for the ensuing year was held 
on the 21st instant, and resulted in the choice of the following 
named gentlemen : 

President, Jacob Underbill ; Yice President, William Norris ; 
Treasurer, Camilo Martin ; Corresponding Secretary, Sydney V. 
Smith ; Recording Secretary, William M. Koyes ; Directors, Ma- 
jor Hiram Leonard, John B. Newton, P. L. Weaver, John C. 
Merrill, C. W. Hathaway, John Wightman, William Alvord, 
Charles D. Haven, and Dr. Thomas Bennett ; gentlemen in whose 
hands the interests of the Association will, undoubtedly, be ably 
sustained. 

On you, the members at large, however, depends in a great 
measure the future prosperity of this institution. The most atten- 
tive and persevering Board of Directors you may select will effect 
but little without your active and hearty co-operation. 

Each member should feel that he has a personal interest in 
the growth of this Association — whose very principle is progress. 



19 

Much has already been accomplished ; but there is much more to 
be done ; there can be no standing still. When we cease to ad- 
vance, we shall inevitably commence to decay. 

And now, having imperfectly performed my last official act, 
I beg to tender to my associates in office, my grateful acknow- 
ledgments for the kindness and courtesy they have extended to me 
as their presiding officer ; and I take great pleasure in testifying to 
the general kind feeling which has marked our deliberations 
during the year. If all we have striven for has not been accom- 
plishd, we are conscious of having devoted our best energies to 
sustain the high character and promote the best interests of this 
Association. 

JAS. W. WHITE, President. 

San Francisco, January 27, 1S62. 



TENTH 



ANNUAL REPORT 



OF THE 



PRESIDENT 



OF TIIE 



gteanttle ^ptoatg §jftwoxtura 



OF 



S^INT FRAWCISCO: 



WITH THE 



TREASURER AND LIBRARIAN'S REPORT, AND 
LIST OF OFFICERS FOR 1863. 



SAN FRANCISCO: 
PRINTED BY J. THOMPSON <fc CO., 505 CLAY STREET, 

1863. 



LIST OF OFFICERS 



Off THE 




fflSn&B teiriaiftw 



FOR, 1863. 



President : 
ALBERT MILLER. 

Vice- President : Treasurer : 

HENRY B. WILLIAMS. FRED'K W. MACONDRAY. 

Corresponding Secretary : Recording Secretary : 

F R A N K D. CARLTON. WM, N. A R T II U R . 

Directors : 
EDWARD F. HALL, Jr., THOMAS BREEZE, 
GEO. C. BOARDMAN, A. L. EDWARDS, 

FRANK E. WEBSTER, JOSEPH HOBART, 

A. P. FLINT, W. MELVIN SMITH, 

WM. M. PIERSON. 

Librarian: Assistant Librarian: 

II. H. MOORE. D. E. WEBB. 

Collector : Janitor : 

J. J. TAYKER. C. H. CANFIELD. 



ANNUAL REPORT 

OF THE 
OF THE 



Balance on hand January 28th, 1862 $ 1,621 31 

RECEIPTS. 

Quarterly Dues received from Members $12,786 50 

Initiation Fees from new Members 788 00 

Life Memberships from six Members 600 00 

Books sold, lost by Members and paid by them 182 50 

Catalogues sold 85 00 

Received from Insurance Companies for fur- 
niture spoiled by water, etc 941 26 

Total receipts for the year $15,333 26 

$16,954 57 
EXPENDITURES. 

Library Account for Books, Periodicals, etc. $2,280 14 

Expense Account, Rent, Gas, Fuel, and petty 

charges 4,582 69 

Salaries of Librarian and Assistants 5,100 00 

Furniture bought 888 76 

Insurance 422 45 

Printing 282 75 

Total expenditures for the year $18,506 79 

Balance in hands of the Treasurer 8,447 78 

$16,954 57 

CAMILO MARTIN, Treasurer. 
San Francisco, January 27th, 1863. 



LIBRARIAN'S REPORT. 



Mercantile Library Rooms, j 
San Francisco, January 28th, 1803. j 

To the Members of the Mercantile Library Association : 

I have the honor of submitting to you the following Report of the 
Statistics and operations of the Library and Reading-rooms from the 
date of my last Annual Report (Jan. 27th, 18G2), to the present time. 

The number of Books loaned from the Library during the year 

was 31,404, which were classified as follows, viz : 

Vols. 
Romance 22,164 

Biography 2,209 

Travels 1. 

History 1,256 

Science 1,087 

There were 1,121 volumes added to the Library during the year, 
which were classified and arranged into the following departments, 



Vols. 
Belles-Lettrcs 1,488 

Poetry 516 

Religion 174 

Bound Periodicals 150 

Miscellaneous 576 



making the numbers in each : 

Romance 3,370 

Travels 1,440 

History 1,527 

Biography 1,269 

Arts and Sciences 1,445 

Belles-Lettres 1,232 



Poetry 1,011 

Religion - 501 

Law and Politics 990 

Reference and Miscellaneous 1,863 

Bound Newspapers 188 

Bound Periodicals 1,270 



The entire number of volumes in the above classification would be 
16,106, except that a deduction of about one thousand volumes 
should be made for books worn out and lost and duplicates sold, since 
the commencement of the system of numbering the classes. 

In the course of the year the Association has been presented with 
many valuable Books, Works of Art, etc., etc., by the following 
gentlemen, libraries, etc. : 



Hon. T. G. Phelps, 
" A. A. Sargent, 
" M. S. Latham, 
" F. F. Low, 
" J. A. McDougal, 
" R. C. Winthrop, 
" Caleb Smith, 
" W. Lowey, 
" J. A. Banks, 
" J. W. Van Zandt, 
" A. P. Morrill, 
Gen. H. M. Naglee, 
Col. S. II. Long, 
Prof. J. D. Whitney, 
Rev. C. R. Clark, 
Dr. G. P. Judd, 
S. H. Barker, 
W. K. Bull, 
Isaac Naylor, 
J. W. Osborn, 
S. V. Smith, 
C. P. Bates, 



W. 



Horace Davis, 
J. M. Hutchins, 
Boston Public Library, 
Dr. A. F. Sawyer, 
Jas. Baxter, 
J. J. Tayker, 
W. McDonell Clarke, 
Wm. Norris, 
G. H. Davis, 
Alex. S. Taylor, 
S. L. M. Barlow, 
Sperry & Perry, 
W. H. Stevens, 

F. Berton, 
E. Conway, 
W. Y. Patch, 

Super'd't U. S. Coast Survey, 
Smithsonian Institution, 
H. G. Langley, 
A. Gibbons, 

G. S. Brown, 
G. S. Fisher, 

M. Pierson. 



The whole number of Members at present belonging to the Asso- 
ciation is 1,786, classified as follows, viz: Life Members, 104; 
Honorary Members, 71 ; Shareholders, 620 ; Subscribing Members, 
991. This shows an increase of 61 paying Members above the num- 
ber reported last year. The following gentlemen became Life Mem- 
bers in course of the year : David D. Colton, John B. Newton, 
Jacob Underbill, Wm. Norris, John G. Kittle, and Andrew B. 
Forbes. 

Respectfully, 

H. H. MOORE, Librarian. 



ANNUAL REPORT 

DELIVERED BY JACOB UNDERBILL, PRESIDENT, 
January 28th, 1863. 



Gentlemen of the Mercantile Library Association : 

In compliance with the direction of the Constitution, I present you 
with the Tenth Annual Report of the proceedings of the Association, 
for the past year, and also a condensed view of the present condition 
of the Library, in its material and finances. Such suggestions as I 
may deem advisable to make as to its future prosperity, will be found 
under the respective divisions of subjects. 

FINANCES. 
At the commencement of the past official year, the Board of Di- 
rectors found a large apparent balance of cash in the Treasury, out 
of which they anticipated buying very considerable additions of new 
books. But upon investigation it was found that most of the dues 
of the quarter then current had been collected, and amounts of unpaid 
bills were outstanding, enough to absorb, with the regular expenses 
of the Association, all its income accruing for the first half-year. 
Having in view the effect of a former excitement caused by the 
opening of a new mining region, it was not deemed pi'udent to incur 
any considerable new indebtedness, until the Treasury of the Asso- 
ciation was beyond the danger which might arise from the rush of 
people to the new fields of gold, reported last spring as being in the 
far North. The last half year has enabled the retiring Board to 
transfer to their successors a Treasury not only free and unin- 
cumbered, but in condition to promote the future usefulness of the 
Library to an extent never before practicable. 

The Treasurer's report shows a net cash balance of $3,447 78 
against which are no outstanding claims, except the current monthly 
expenses falling due at the end of the month, and such bills for new 
books as have been bought by the Committee since January 1st. 



9 

The tutal receipts from all sources, exclusive of amount received 
for damage by fire, were $14,392 00. This shows an average 
monthly revenue in round numbers of $1,200. The current monthly 
expenses averaged $866 00. There is scarcely a doubt that a steady 
increase of revenue will be gained in each succeeding year, without 
any enlargement of expenses. 

MEMBERSHIP. 
The last annual report to the Association showed the total number 
of members was 1,725 ; classified as follows : — 

Life Members 106 

Honorary Members 70 

Shareholders delinquent 393 

Shareholders paying dues 225 

Subscribing Members 931 — 1,725 

During the past year the following losses have occurred : — 

By withdrawal 242 

By removal from city 139 

By death 6— 387 

Of new members, there have been added : — 

Life Members 6 

Honorary Member 1 

Shareholders 2 

Subscribing Members 447 — 456 

Present total of membership is as follows : — 

Life Memberships 104 

Honorary Members 71 

Shareholders delinquent 429 

Shareholders paying dues 191 

Subscribing Members 991 

Total —1,786 

Net increase for the year, 61. This is, however, only apparent as 
34 shares of stock have ceased to pay dues in this period — an error 
in the number of Life Memberships as reported last year, will, how- 
ever, swell the aggregate by some 8 more. Total number of members 
of classes paying dues, 1,182. 

BOOKS. 
An addition of 1,121 volumes has been made to the Library during 
the past year, of which 958 were purchased, and 163 were pre- 
sented. Among those procured by purchase is a complete set of 



10 

the Latin Classics, Velpy's Delphin Edition, an acquisition which 
few Libraries can boast of, even in the older cities. Owing to the 
troubled condition of our public affairs, comparatively few new books 
have been published during the past two years, and this cause, in 
connection with a new arrangement for the procuring of such works, 
makes the aggregate of books purchased during the year appear 
small as compared with former years. 

Soon after entering upon their official duties, the Board of 
Directors, were enabled to make arrangements for a supply of new 
books, without depending upon the judgment of Eastern publishers, 
as to selections and numbers of copies sent, advantageous terms were 
made with a large importing house in this city, and an important 
element of economy has been gained by the change, besides the 
avoidance of an accumulation of undesirable books. A sale of 320 
volumes of duplicate copies was made during the year. Several 
applications for donations of such works have been made to the 
Board by Hospitals and other charitable institutions, but no power 
existing by which the Directors could make such dispositions of the 
property of the Association, these requests oould not be complied 
with. A considerable number of such volumes bein<r still in the 
Library, I would recommend that the Association take action to 
authorize the Board of Directors to dispose of such superflous books 
as now encumber the shelves, in donations to institutions deemed to 
have claims on our liberality. 

In this connection, I would mention that a carefully selected order 
for Standard works has been forwarded to New York, and it is only 
matter of regret, that our means did not warrant the Board in send- 
ing forward at an earlier day, other and larger orders for same cla«« 
of books. 

DONATIONS. 

The thanks of the Association are due to the following gentle- 
men, for their valuable gifts to the property of the Library : 

To Win. Norris, Esq., for Crillray's Caricatures, complete, in 
Morocco binding — a rare and increasingly valuable work. 

To Horace Davis, Esq., for 39 volumes of Government reports and 
documents, and miscellaneous books. 

To Hons. T. Gr. Phelps, J. A. McDougal, F. F. Low, M. S. 

Latham, and the Secretary of the Interior, for complete sets of Con- 
gressional documents and reports. 

LECTURES. 
Although unsuccessful in the procuring of lecturers suitable for 






11 

delivering such a course as the character of our Association demands, 
the outgoing Board of Directors have not been unmindful of the 
value and importance of such an addition to its means of usefulness. 
Early in their official year, attention was given to the subject and 
negotiations were opened with distinguished speakers both here and 
at the East. But either from public or private causes, all our appli- 
cations failed, and the season became so far advanced that further 
efforts were suspended. That the Board was in earnest as regards 
this interest of the Association, I may mention the names of Everett 
and Beecher, as among those with whom correspondence was opened, 
unfortunately without success. 

PRINTING, CONSTITUTION, BY-LAWS, Ac. 
At the last anuual meeting the new Board of Directors was 
ordered to have printed a sufficient number of copies of the Consti- 
tution, as amended at that meeting — in addition to this, the Board 
subsequently revised the By-Laws, Rules and Regulations of the 
Library and Rooms, and when completed, two thousand copies of 
the whole were printed, and they have been, since that time, in the 
hands of the Librarian for distribution to members. 

ROOMS. 
The lease for Rooms occupied by the Association being self- 
renewing, and no objection appearing against such renewal, the 
Board has made no alteration in the relations of the Association in 
this respect. The renewal is for three years upon same terms as 
heretofore. 

In March last a destructive fire in the wooden building adjoining 
the Library on the East, threatened to involve the property of the 
Association in a common ruin. By the skill and courage of the Fire 
Department the ravages of the flames were prevented from extending 
to the interior of our apartments, but the damage from smoke and 
water was very considerable in the Reading Room. The energetic 
efforts of the Librariau and his assistants secured the removal of 
most of the property from that room, and excepting about ten days' 
interruption of the business of the Library, we escaped without loss 
other than was promptly made good by the several Fire Insurance 
Cos., by whom the property was insured. Too great praise cannot 
be awarded to those members of the Fire Department who had 
charge in our building, for their successful efforts to prevent a deluo-e 
of water being poured upon that portion of our rooms occupied by 
the Books — but for their skillful exertions the damage would have 
been irreparable. 



12 

LIBRARY BUILDING. 
Each retiring President of the Association has, in his Annual 
Report, dwelt upon the importance of devising some plan by which 
a building for the uses of the Association might be secured, and over 
which a controlling interest should be maintained by the Association. 
Various plans have been suggested, but at no former period of the 
existence of the Library has an opportunity occurred for a definite 
be°inning. The past year has demonstrated that the Association is 
not only self-sustaining, but by a judicious use of its income it may 
be able to appropriate each year a sum so considerable towards a fund 
for building purposes, as to warrant combined exertions on the part 
of those interested in the welfare of the Association. I would earn- 
estly recommend from present balance in the Treasury, an appropria- 
tion of $2,000, to be invested as a fund known as the " Building 
Fund of the Association," and that the proceeds of all Life Mem- 
berships be devoted to same purpose in each subsequent year. Be- 
lievimr that at each annual meeting a like sum as that above-mentioned 
can be devoted to same purpose, there will soon be such a nucleus for 
combined effort that it can hardly fail of success. I deem it of the 
highest importance that action be taken at once in this matter, so that 
at the expiration of present lease of our rooms, we may be prepared 
to move into a building controlled entirely for our own interests. 

INSURANCE. 

An additional sum of $5,000 has been added to amount insured 
during the past year. 

Policies are now running as follows : 

Phoenix Insurance Company, Hartford, Conn $5,000 

Hartford " " " " 5,000 

Etna " " " " 5,000 

Manhattan " " New York 5,000 

Relief " " " 5,000 

California " " San Francisco 5,000 

Total $30,000 

CHANGES IN BOARD OF DIRECTORS. 
In consequence of ill health, Wm. Alvord, Esq., resigned, and the 
vacancy was filled by the election of Horace Davis, Esq. Charles 
D. Haven, Esq., being about to leave the State also tendered his 
resignation, and A. L. Edwards, Esq., was elected in his stead. 

LIBRARIAN AND ASSISTANTS. 
\ Mr. H. H. Moore, Librarian, and Mr. 1). E. Webb, Assistant- 



13 

Librarian, have been continued in their respective positions during 
the past year, and with renewed diligence have discharged their 
responsible duties. 

Mr. J. J. Tayker, it is almost needless to mention, continues to act 
as Collector. 

C. H. Canfield was appointed Janitor soon after the present Board 
took office, and his services in that capacity have been very satisfactory. 
There has been no change of salaries during the past year. 

At the annual election held on the 19th instant, the following 
named gentlemen were chosen as the officers of the Association for 
the ensuing year : President, Albert Miller ; Vice-President, Henry 
B. Williams ; Treasurer, Fredk. W. Macondray ; Corresponding 
"Secretary, Frank I). Carlton ; Recording Secretary, Win. N. Arthur; 
Directors, Edward F. Hall, Jr., Thos. Breeze, George C. Boardman, 
A. L. Edwards, Francis E. Webster, Jos. Hobart, A. P. Flint, W. 
Melvin Smith, Wm. M. Pierson. Some of these gentlemen have 
served in former Boards, all may be relied upon as representatives of 
our interests, in whose hands we may confidently place them. 

In conclusion, gentlemen, I would impress upon you the importance 
to which our Library has arrived — it is a public necessity for which 
there is no substitute, and its usefulness now, although so considerable, 
is but the beginning of far greater good, which it is destined to 
perform, if maintained upon its present liberal and judicious plan. 
In a commercial metropolis, like San Francisco, it is eminently 
proper that its chief Library should be known as the " Mercantile," 
offering at the same time to the higher wants of intellect in all 
classes, such abundant store of knowledge as shall satisfy all 
demands. 

And now I close my official labors with the sincere wish that the 
harmony and kind feeling which have prevailed in the Board of 
Direction during the past year may be perpetuated in all future 
Boards ; and for the uniform courtesy extended to myself, I offer my 
sincere acknowledgments. Anxious only for the prosperity of the 
Association, I know that they will unite with me in wishing, that 
whatever fruit may have arisen from our labors, our successors in 
office may be able to promote the same good cause, with still greater 
profit to the Association. 

JACOB UNDERBILL, President. 

San Francisco, January 28th, 1863.